MRI Results Viewing Software

MRI Results Viewing Software

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Terry01
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MRI Results Viewing Software

I just picked up a CD with my MRI results. There are lots of pictures and is labeled “DICOM Volume with GE Centricty Viewer”.

I cannot see what I was shown when at the hospital and they seemed to be able to move the mouse around the body (and show the disk against the nerve). Would I have been given the full volume of images? My guess is that I have and they are simply using more advanced software (combining all photos and believe there is a professional version of software) so they could show the problem better? Any technical people out there that can confirm I have the complete results?

Terry

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Terry01
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Thanks

Believe I can assume the hospital used some advanced DICOM viewing software. The disk does have an autorun.exe which starts the basic DICOM software. I can see lots of pictures in sets which can be run like a slideshow (Up and Down OR around the body) but not as saw in hospital.

I just wanted to be confident I had everything before leaving the country and now am as confident as much as I could be.

Thanks and kind regards
Terry

Z06 (not verified)
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DICOM Viewer

The DICOM Viewer loaded on most CDs is an old version. I believe that is partly on the hospital. I had MRI done at 2 different hospitals. Also had CT Scan done at 2 different hospitals. 2 of the CDs I got in 2007 have a Dicom Viewer dated from 2005. I CD with a CT Scan from 2008 has a Dicom Viewer from 2007.

Now here is the cool one. I got an MRI done in late 2008. It does not have Dicom per say. It has the RSVS System. Instead of just pulling images into Dicom Viewer. It manages Case Studies. It lets you view libraries of images. You can manipulate, rotate, etc... It does a lot. Haven't quite figured it all out. The Neurosurgeon I saw last actually sat down with me and showed me how to use the software. He had a slow day and was bored. We spent an hour alone just playing with the software.

Z06 (not verified)
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Making or Converting images from your MRI studies.

There was some discussion in Chat about making screensavers with our MRI studies. Or just getting the images in a format you can use. To email your friends, photochop, or whatever to amuse yourself.

First you need to download the dicom viewer / converter. It's free.

http://dicom.online.fr/fr/download.htm

Just follow the instructions and download the file dicomworks_135b.exe. Then double click it and install it.

After that click the DicomWorks icon and start the program.

Click the DICOM Directory Button and point to the device (CD) or directory your study is on. Example I copied my CD to my hard drive in a directory. say like MRI_02Oct09. So i chose that. You can just read right from the CD.

Now click the study name in the Patient Name panel. It should be you name.

Now click on the Export Button.

Leave this;
Source: Selected Patient Images
File Format: (change this to JPEG or BMP)
Destination: C:\ScreenSaver

I chose that Destination because I can then use the images for my screen saver on my computer. You can pick any folder. For File Format:. JPEG and BMP are easiest to deal with in most applications.

Now Click Next

On the Next screen click all the boxes except the one that says "Compress all files in a single ZIP archive".

Click Save.

Now it will convert all the images from Dicom format to Jpeg or whatever you chose.

With your favorite picture viewer you can view C:\ScreenSaver and see all your images.

Fun, fun...

Graham

saltzworks
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SWEET!! I can't wait to go

SWEET!!

I can't wait to go try this! I've got my CD's but have never been able to access them - THANKS FOR THIS HOW-TO post!

dilauro
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I have made multiple copies of the original MRI

and it all looks fine with the software that comes with the CD... Now, If I know what the heck I was really looking for!!!!

As Paul said, the version of software we get as patients is different from the doctors. I took one of my MRI CD's to my doctor friend and when he brought it up, there were many more options, one being to select which patient he was going to look at...
But it seemed to me, once inside the images, it looked the same.
Well, to me, an untrained eye they looked the same, to someone with skills, they might have looked differently

Ron DiLauro Spine-Health System Moderator
Dont laugh at me

Aviatrix36440
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Docs vs. Patients...

dilauro wrote:
and it all looks fine with the software that comes with the CD... Now, If I know what the heck I was really looking for!!!!

As Paul said, the version of software we get as patients is different from the doctors. I took one of my MRI CD's to my doctor friend and when he brought it up, there were many more options, one being to select which patient he was going to look at...
But it seemed to me, once inside the images, it looked the same.
Well, to me, an untrained eye they looked the same, to someone with skills, they might have looked differently

Howdy Ron!

From what my NS told me, there are like 3 different softwares out there, and many of the offices "purchase" the full rights. My NS also stated that except for edit options and such, most of what *we* see, is what they see! I have Adobe Pro, so I can extract into a separate file and play with the images and such. Just a wee bit more flexibility is what they get - as patients, we really aren't limited on *most* software that much.

I have found however, on some software, if you copy it to your puter...it will limit how many times you view it if you don't "pay and register", yet on the CD, no such limitation! Weird huh?

Brenda

PCTF C4 - T2, Laminectomies C5, C6 & C7. Severe Palsy left arm/hand.

dilauro
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MRI copies and viewing

Brenda,
Hi....
I have copied my MRI images about a dozen times...
But, this is what I do.
I first copy my original MRI CD to my harddrive. Then from my harddrive I make all my copies.
I have a folder (DIAGS) that list all my MRI and X-rays dating back way too many years. I think my first image was before there were even computers.
But it is good to know that we can keep and preserve our diagnostic tests.
I keep the originals in my Safe along with the reports.
All other copies and details I keep in my shelves.
I would just wish there was a way to copy/scan the large MRI films onto a CD.

Ron DiLauro Spine-Health System Moderator
Dont laugh at me

Aviatrix36440
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CD storage... :-)

Hi Ron!!

Actually you can put those puppies on a CD!!! I have a directory I just call "images", and them in it I export the images or "studies" into it. I then make a sub folder to which I date it, or title it "pre op C5/6, post op C6/7, X-ray" etc, and then you can copy them to the CD. Once you export them, they are now (most software can do this) in the jpg or bmp, pdf or tif....whatever you wish them to be in. I have all of mine copied over such that I don't need the viewing software!!! Hope that helps. Smile

Oh, footnote... you can copy the whole report with the viewer to your CD as well, but you can only put like 4 of them on the CD....

Brenda
(partial computer geek!)

PCTF C4 - T2, Laminectomies C5, C6 & C7. Severe Palsy left arm/hand.

dilauro
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Oh its good to know another computer geek (partial)

I have three passions in life (not including the love I have for my family and wife)

1 - Computers - Anything about them
2 - Spinal problems - I guess dealing with tem for over 30 years I have some insight
3 - Wines - Before I worked with IBM for 35 years, I was a wine salesmen. Still during that time, I ran wine tastings, organized wine dinners and right now I am working parttime at a wine shop. Wine is in my blood

Ron DiLauro Spine-Health System Moderator
Dont laugh at me

Z06 (not verified)
Title: Member
Viewer and Editor tools

Computers and Math are hard. I don't like them but I've worked on them for a "few" years... I just like surfing the web Smile That said...

The Dicom Viewer that is freely distributable. The one I listed above. For most people that is sufficient. It lets you read the images and convert them to traditional graphics formats like jpeg etc. Not too hard to see herniations or DDD if you have a clue. Seeing more takes some training. There are a couple of colleges medical departments that have some good docs on this online. I would have to dig up the links to them.

The version on the CD from the hospital radiology dept. That let's you view your studies. Since they burn each CD with just that visit. There is 1 Patient Study. You could merge all your studies if you like. You would need to copy the CD to a folder on your hard drive. That would be the base folder where you run the Dicom from. If you look at the sub folders. under /DAT. You find /PAT1. That is Patient 1. So from the first CD leave it alone. Now create more of these sub folders as /PAT2, /PAT3, and so on. Go get your 2nd CD. Load it and copy the contents of its /PAT1 to your new /PAT2 on your hard drive. Then get 3rd CD and copy its /PAT1 contents to /PAT3 on your hard drive. Keep on doing this ad nauseum...

Now you have 1 copy of the Dicom software and all your studies. Saves a lot of disk space. You can burn that top level folder to a CD and hold way more than 4 studies. I've got 8 or 9 of them on 1 CD. I have a copy on my USB memory stick that travels with me all the time. So I can read them anywhere there is a computer.

There is also another piece of software that comes from RADinfo Systems. They make the cool stuff. It's not free. They have 1 product called RSVS Viewer. It's like Dicom Viewer only to the next level. It reads all Dicom CDs and more. I've used it. It let's you use multiple monitors and attempts to give you 3D type rendering. Tres' cool....

My ortho had this and would just import my CD patient study into his computer. Then give me my CD back. The 1st neuro I visited used the Dicom on the CD. He wasn't very computer savvy. But he could manipulate the images with the tools in the software and show you exactly what he didn't like. That is sufficient for a patient. My current neuro who just did my fusion. He is old school. He wants the images from the hospital. You bring them to him. He could care less about their report or CD. He told me not to bother waiting for either. He makes his own analysis and reports.

I always get the hospital to make me CDs. For MRI, CAT, or XRAY. Having all past images shows the progression. Most doctors don't seem to care. Since they only fix the current problem. As patients we need the history so any questions about the past can be answered.

Graham

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