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Major numbness in leg post-op L5-S1. Help!

AnonymousUserAAnonymousUser Posts: 49,899
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:29 AM in Back Surgery and Neck Surgery
Hi everyone.

I'm new to this board. I had L5-S1 microdiscectomy and laminectomy three days ago. Surgery was prescribed as I was having major numbness in leg, and foot, and serious pain on the calf. I also lost reflex in foot.

Since the operation, the numbness has been increasing considerably, much more than it was before. Every morning since the operation I wake up feeling my leg more numb and stiff, with decreased mobility. I can't find a good position to sleep on, and I wake up increasingly numb, tingly, with a bit of pain radiating down to the heel.


I am very scared. I don't know what I can do. Any suggestions?
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Comments

  • I think you should call your surgeon. It might be nothing to worry about, but it doesn't sound good.
    There is always pain and tingling during the healing process, lots of stuff was moved around in there. The nerves are inflamed and irritated, and when the nerves aren't happy, nobody is happy.
    Try to rest, and call your doctor as soon as possible. Hopefully, everything will be fine. Good luck!
  • Welcome to the boards here, and to the community. I would reccomend also talking to your surgeon about the pain your having post op. It could be like jeq said, nothing too much to worry about but its always good to talk to your surgeon and relay what your feeling. In the first few weeks, heck even now at four months, I have what I call the symptom of the week. Its normal, as Ive seen many on here have increased pain at first due to inflamation around the surgical site, nerves and the like. I had pain enough that they got my inflamation under control in the first week with a steroid pack and that was for me a god send, and allowed me to get off pain meds a week later. Talk to your doctor and try (know its hard) to not get too worked up over it, your so fresh out of surgery that this could be inflamation causing pain. Its normal to feel tingles and twitches etc..hang in there. Keep us and your doc updated, and welcome to spine health. Best Wishes
    Erica
  • Thanks for your replies and support.

    I paged the hospital, and they called me back within minutes. The neurosurgeon on duty called me back. This is what I was told:

    Right now it is too early to tell if anything is wrong, since I just had the procedure done three days ago. The entire area is very swollen, because there's been muscle cut, and bones and disc tissue removed. Until the swelling decreases in the coming days, I won't be able to start noticing any improvement.

    It does make me feel a bit better to hear this, but it's very unsettling that after going through such invasive operation, today I feel my leg is more numb and weak than it was before the operation. It scares me and makes me nervous about the healing process. The mind has a way to race in all sorts of directions when you are afraid.

    I know that everyone's physiology is different, and everyone reacts differently to surgery. Some people find relief right away, some people do not. Is there are percentage for this? How long until folks start feeling the surgery made a difference?
  • it was the swelling. Are you icing your back? If you put a towel barrier between your skin/dressings and an ice pack (maybe a plastic bag too to prevent wetness), the ice can help the swelling go down. Your nerves get more compressed from the swelling. Hope you continue to heal and feel better soon!

    Linda


    3 level spinal fusion, L3/4, L4/5, L5/S1, November 2008. Stiff, but I can walk.
  • There is no way to answer your questions, even though it is something we all wish we knew the answer to. First as you stated, everyone heals differently. Everyone starts out with a different situation -- a nerve is more compressed, a foramen is more plugged, etc.

    My surgeon told me a story to illustrate how there is no way to predict who will heal perfectly and who will end up with problems. He operated on one person who had a lot of nerve compression. He and his assistant had a terrible time getting the nerves untangled and freed up. They had to tug and pull and he was very afraid that the patient would end up with some problems. That patient recovered quickly and was completely pain free. That same week he did the same procedure on another woman. He said the surgery was textbook perfect -- everything went perfectly -- the nerve was not entrapped -- no pulling or tugging was involved. He was very pleased that it had gone so well. The lady recovered, but a week later she called him to report foot drop, something she had NEVER had prior to surgery. There was no logical reason for why this occurred, and he was as mystified as anyone. So he told me that a surgeon can do a perfect surgery but there still is no guarantee that everything will turn out the way we want it to.

    For the type of surgery you had, some people feel great relief immediately. Some gradually start to feel better and some recover and feel as they did prior to surgery. It is a crap shoot.

    Hopefully you will be among the lucky ones.
  • I hope you're feeling better soon and to do the icing as said earlier. I hope the numbness and pain go but still follow up with your own Surgeon and see him as he may have a treatment for you or take another MRI. Take care. Charry
    DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing c-spine c4-c7 RN
  • Were your leg and foot numb to this extend before surgery, or it get worse.

    After my surgery, I was in the same situation like you, I couldn't move my leg. When the recovery nurse woke me, the first thing I said was, 'I can't feel my foot'. Immediately she notified the surgeon, and he came to access it. I failed the pin test or any commands. I just can't move my foot. An MRI was done, and within days, I had another surgery. The problem was re-herniation and fragments found. After that surgery, the leg and foot pain and numbness left.
  • I, too have had a LOT of worrisome things going on during my recovery thus far . I posted all of it, but my computer got hijacked, and much of it disappeared. In a nutshell: numbness increases exponentially after the surgery, was told to ice and take ibuprofen, and eventually, it just went away. On the third day home, while moving in bed, I felt an explosion of pain in my lower back (felt like everything broke), but mechanically, everything was fine, but to this day if I move a certain way while in bed, I have this same explosion, and I find it very difficult to get out of bed without getting the same pain. HOWEVER, after sleeping around 3-4 hours, MOST times, this symptom disappears for the night. My pre-op pain was back almost immediately, but after 3 weeks in water therapy, I am finally beginning to feel relief, and today I got my own tens unit, which will hopefully get me off the pain meds I'm still on. (my surgeon told me I would be off work for at least 6 month post op, but I am determined to prove him wrong!) I started out post-op taking one step forward, and 10 back, but I am close to taking 3 steps forward and 1 back now. As you can see, everyone is different. I was practically afraid of every little buzz in my back, but as time goes on I am getting used to it. Don't be afraid to call your surgeon (most likely you will talk to his/her pa, but they know what they are talking about). Many times I felt like I was being blown off, but I think it was just because the things that were upsetting me were nothing to be getting worked up about. But, just in case, call them for whatever you feel you need to, they will know if you should worry. Also, even if they blow you off the first time, if the symptoms persist, call them and tell them again! Maybe something is normal for one period of time, and after that amount of time, it needs to be looked into, (such as the numbness). I'm rambling, but I hope I got the point I was trying to make across!

    Take care!

    ~Kat
  • 1 major thing did after surgery was to ice the lower back every 2 hrs to keep down swelling still do 5 months after micro in l5-s1. I did have and still have days where i feel weaker then othersbut at first after sugery i feltstronger with every passing day un till i hit what seems to be a platue. But i does take along tiime for verves to heal. I did have intense burning in my foot like if you have ever gotten your hands really cold and them pu them under hot water. I have abig ice pack that i got from the pharmacy its about 12inches by 24 inches the gel type. I just asked the pharmasist for one.Hope you get feeling better.
  • To answer your questions, yes, my leg and foot were numb and painful before surgery for several months, but it's different now. Pain was worse before surgery. Numbness is worse now than before.

    Today numbness got a bit worse, and the weakness increased too. Before surgery, the pain in the calf and the weakness in ankle and back of knee made me limp very noticeably. Saturday/Sunday I noticed that at least I was not limping. That was the one single improvement I noticed after the procedure.

    Well, I started limping again today. :S

    I'm worried, as I feel a very noticeable decrease in control of the leg.

    Last night it was awful. I couldn't lay on my back, as it increased discomfort and leg numbness. I had to carefully move around, time and time again, to stay on my side.

    Through the day I noticed how pain, weakness and numbness were slowly but surely increasing. I can move my foot and ankle, there's no foot drop, but the leg down the knee feels completely asleep, mostly in the heel and foot.

    Also, for whatever is worth, I felt a very mild spasm from the back down the buttocks a few times today. It lasted a few seconds every time. Not painful, but weird.

    I called the doctor, and assistant mentioned it's too early to tell, but it's probably the inflammation of the lumbar area. I'm adding ibuprofen, in addition to the pain medication, as they suggested. Getting very worried. :SS
  • JohnnyDoe said:
    Hi everyone.

    I'm new to this board. I had L5-S1 microdiscectomy and laminectomy three days ago. Surgery was prescribed as I was having major numbness in leg, and foot, and serious pain on the calf. I also lost reflex in foot.

    Since the operation,
    the numbness has been increasing considerably, much more than it was before. Every morning since the operation I wake up feeling my leg more numb and stiff, with decreased mobility. I can't find a good position to sleep on, and I wake up increasingly numb, tingly, with a bit of pain radiating down to the heel.


    I am very scared. I don't know what I can do. Any suggestions?
    Hi Johnny,

    Is the numbness and pain getting any better? I had PLIF surgery, L5,S1 12 days ago and I have felt numbness and nerve pain once in awhile even 12 days later. I have a 2 week post op appointment tomorrow and I am hoping that an X-ray is taken so that I can be reassured that everything is ok and that my nerve pain is just from inflammation. I Ice my back a lot during the day which seems to help.
  • I would watch it VERY closely!

    How numb are you? Can you feel a pin sticking into the flesh hard enough that it will draw blood?

    I had increasing numbness post surgery in my right leg. Pre-surgery I only had pain in the left.

    I felt like my right leg had turned into a wooden block. I could not feel scratching, tapping or pins.

    The surgeon watched it for a day and by day 2 I was back in the OR with a second surgery to explore and find out what was going on.

    Ultimately we do not know if the BMP inside the spine was giving me an allergic reaction or if my hemorhaging (sp?) was compressing the nerves. In any case the second surgery halted the progression.

    BUT - that was all last July. I STILL have all that numbness in my right leg and am now having atrophy and cramping from the nerve damage.

    So, watch it - closely
  • In my case I had a bulging disc but it broke apart leaving bone fragments. I had no insurance and was trying to heal at home but had emergency surgery a week later. I had lost bowel control and was numb at waist( a speedo would cover numb area). It's been almost 10 months and Im still the same. The surgeon said it may take 3 to 6 months to return because of swelling. Im about to give up on ever getting feeling back. I know this isnt very helpful but count your blessings because it could be much worse.I feel your pain and wish you the best on healing.
  • Well, things have been going downhill since the last time I posted.
    • - On Tuesday night I was awakened at around 5.00am by the worst, most debilitating pain I've ever felt. It was like the entire lower half of my body was stiff, and every muscle, bone, and joint in unbearable pain. I had difficulty getting out of bed, and could barely stand up by myself.
      Once I was able to stand up, I took my painkillers, and paced around the house until the pain subsided a bit. I was able to fall sleep again. When I woke up later, the pain wasn't as bad. Through the day, I iced my lower back several times, for 15 minutes each time.
      .

      - Wednesday: The pain and numbness has increased from the knee down (left leg only). The numbness is worse than before surgery. The pain is now at the same level it was prior to the operation. I'm limping again!
      .

      - I visited my doctor yesterday, worried about the situation. They noticed the weakness and numbness, but they told me that all that I am feeling is part of the healing process. Everything is very swollen in the area that's been operated, so I should expect things to feel weird until the inflammation comes down. At the same time, they said I should start noticing some improvement soon. I was scheduled for my official first post-op revision for next week. If things don't improve by then, they will conduct a new MRI.
      .

      - Today the numbness, pain and weakness are a bit worse than yesterday. Every day is worse than the day before. Moving around the house (slowly and carefully) I noticed that some movements gave me a funny feeling in the lower back and increased pain in the sciatica nerve down the leg.

    I'm feeling a bit hopeless today, as I'm not noticing any of the promised improvements from the surgery. What's more, I'm feeling negative about the process, thinking it may be worse now. Maybe I should be patient and give it more time. I wish I knew what to do. What should I do? I can't resign myself to the idea that this is going to be like this forever.
  • You need a pep talk! It is important to somehow get over the hopeless feelings that you are having. It is MUCH, MUCH too early to feel negative. Your body has been through a major trauma and you very well may feel worse before things start to improve.

    Having spine surgery bears no resemblance to surgery on any other part or system of the body. For example, when you have your appendix out, the organ is removed and you are left with the surgical pain to recover from. In spine surgery you have that to contend with, but that is actually the easy part. Back surgery is like a small construction project and your surgeon is a highly trained carpenter. During the course of surgery s/he will use the tools of the building trade...a hammer, a saw, a drill, a giant pair of tweezers, etc. During surgery the nerve will likely be tugged upon, stretched and handled. No matter how careful the surgeon is, the nerve is going through a traumatic process after having already been traumatized by the compression it underwent prior to surgery. The nerve is angry and pissed off and unfortunately it takes a LONG time to recover...much longer than any of us think it should take.

    There is often a good deal of inflammation after surgery which presses on that same angry nerve, just like the disc did prior to surgery. Eventually the swelling will abate and the nerve will have more space, and will gradually begin to calm and quiet down.

    For now you should take all the meds that have been prescribed to you as directed by your surgeon. You should walk as you are able a number of times each day. Distance is not important...speed is even less important. Shorten up your "normal" stride if it is more comfortable. The idea is to move to increase blood flow and to stretch out the nerve. Nothing does this as well as walking. Your job for now is to rest and to walk. Try not to sit up for too long at a time.

    If you continue to be so uncomfortable, you will probably be given an oral steroid such as prednisone to bring down the inflammation. Hopefully you will start to feel a little better by your doctor's appointment. Try not to panic and worry about the outcome at this point. What you are feeling is fairly common to what many of us experience.

    We're here to help you. Post with your questions or if you just need to vent. We all understand what you are going through.

    Hang in there --

    xx Gwennie
  • is what I would suggest. It is obvious that something is not right. I can't believe the "it's part of the healing process" crap!

    Keep a positive attitude if at all possible and get through it. It can only get better.
  • Having had the same debilitating night pain (I call them explosions, by NS keeps calling them muscle spasms, but at 2+ months, I still don't believe that's what's happening). I can tell you this, when I was finally again able to get a good nights sleep at first thanks to more Valium, and then due to my new Tens unit, the explosions became more like cramps, and I was able to get from laying down to sitting in under 10 minutes, but still have the nerve pain in my bottom sitting just after, and leg weakness after standing up. So, even though I'm not thoroughly happy with this, it's better than laying in bed working up the nerve to move another inch, all the while crying and wishing I was dead (at least until morning) If you would have told me pre-op that, yes there is a pain worse than 10, I would not have believed you, but there it is as you've learned first hand. Take it ez when your body tells you too, and when you are crying in bed because you are afraid to move, remember me, I'm not afraid anymore, and there IS a light at the end of the tunnel. At the same time, continue to tell your Surgeon about the continued pain/weakness and what all you are having. At one point I made mine, and they gave me the 2 things that helped me get through the longest nights of my life.

    Hang in there!

    ~kat
  • When surgeons points the reason is inflammation after surgery, that is correct. You are only 6 days post-op. You still can move your leg right, it is not totally numb till you can't move (My foot was numb till I couldn't feel or move). So, there is hope. Did the doc mention to you when you should start to worry? Walking may strengthen the muscles. No matter how tough it is, take short walks. I am more concerned on the weakness part, though, and the doctors acknowledged that. However, keep thinking positive, I know how hard it is, but you need to believe that your body is working hard to repair itself and healing. My thoughts and prayers are with you.
  • gwennie17 said:
    You need a pep talk! It is important to somehow get over the hopeless feelings that you are having. It is MUCH, MUCH too early to feel negative. Your body has been through a major trauma and you very well may feel worse before things start to improve.
    (...)

    There is often a good deal of inflammation after surgery which presses on that same angry nerve, just like the disc did prior to surgery. Eventually the swelling will abate and the nerve will have more space, and will gradually begin to calm and quiet down.
    (...)
    Thanks for the pep talk, Gwennie. I know you are right when you say it's too early to panic, and most people around me tell me the same. I think this may have to do with how the doctors have managed my expectations. See, the day after surgery, every single one of the doctors and associates that dropped by my hospital room asked the same thing: "Does it feel better?" "Is the pain gone?" "You are feeling much better now, right?" I know that some people notice an improvement right after surgery, but it wasn't my case. According to the doctors, the surgery went very well, and they all seemed to expect me to feel better right away.

    As the days passed and I didn't feel any improvement, but rather increased discomfort and numbness, their talk has changed to "give it time" and "it will take a while"... but then they also say "you'll start feeling a bit better every day." It seems like a contradictory message, especially in the face of how I'm feeling a bit more pain and irritation (acute radiculopathy down the sciatica) every day.

    I know I should not panic or feel negative, but even their questions make me feel like I was supposed to be better already, when I'm not. It seems like clashing messages when I'm told I'm supposed to be feeling better every day, but if I don't, well, that's a normal part of healing, and it will take a while. See my point?

    Your comments (as well as the shared experiences of other people in this forum) help me understand the process a lot. I've had nerve compression for several months before surgery, so I understand it won't go away overnight. My doctors are great, believe me, and have been very supportive and informative, but I think they need to let me know a bit more what to expect from the process. They certainly explained there are a 5% of cases that never improve after surgery. I am aware of that risk and dread the idea of ending up in that number. I guess, as others have suggested, they should let me know when I'm supposed to freak out officially. I know it's just been a week. I know, I know.
  • pepperqq said:
    When surgeons points the reason is inflammation after surgery, that is correct. You are only 6 days post-op. You still can move your leg right, it is not totally numb till you can't move (My foot was numb till I couldn't feel or move). So, there is hope. Did the doc mention to you when you should start to worry? Walking may strengthen the muscles. No matter how tough it is, take short walks. I am more concerned on the weakness part, though, and the doctors acknowledged that. However, keep thinking positive, I know how hard it is, but you need to believe that your body is working hard to repair itself and healing. My thoughts and prayers are with you.
    Yes, it's been a week. I can move the leg and even though it's completely numb, I can move the foot and ankle, although it feels very weak. If I push my toes upwards, and someone pushes them down, it's easy to see the foot is very weak. I can still move it indeed, which is a good sign, but with pronounced weakness.

    The worst is the nerve pain coming down the back of the leg all the way to the very numb heel. The pain is particularly pronounced all over the calf, to the point where all the muscles in the calf feel tight, like locked in a flexing motion, and it makes me limp. I can't tiptoe on that leg.

    For the record, this radiculopathy, weakness and numbness in the leg were there before surgery. As a matter of fact, these issues are what took me to surgery! A week after surgery, it feels as if all those symptoms have increased considerably. The pain and numbness are certainly much more pronounced now than before surgery.

    I agree with you that the doctors should let me know clearly when is the official deadline to worry.

    PS: I try to walk around as much as possible, despite the debilitating pain in the calf and the pronounced limp.
  • i had my micro on l5-s1 nov 13 08. I still have tingling in foot. I alsohad foot drop and still do alittle. Shortly after surgery my lower legg calf and foot felt like your fingers when youve frozen em them thaw them out. They told me it might take up to 1 yr fortingling to go away if it does. when i ruptered the disk did damage to nerve on left side and compressed spinal cord to 1/2 its size. Im doing quiet well and was back to work march 3rd 09. I feel it is a bit early but ive got a family to feed and we were looking at loosing everything. I take it very easy at work as easy as i can i work in a plywood plant.When i started using ice all the time the tingling got better quick. Hope ya get better. Ive never had any numbness.
  • The only way to find out is to request for an mri. I had an mri done immediately, like the next day or two, and found the problem. If it is inflammation, you can see the swelling and it could be pressing on the nerves. It that will give you a piece of mind, see if your doc is willing to order one for you. But I want to say, give it another week or two, and see if you have any relieve.

    Great that you are trying to walk. Also, make sure you don't sit on softy couch. It makes the pain worse and more numbness. Best to you, john.
  • Sorry to say but it sounds like you have a herniated disc. I had a laminectomy and had to go back to work 2 weeks later limping. So, I remained on pain medication and then tried physical therapy for 3 weeks. Since I was just getting worse, the doctor ordered a MRI which showed a herniated disc pressing against my nerve. It was causing nerve, leg pain down both legs. So, I was worse after the laminectomy. So, the doctor gave me 2 choices - another laminectomy or a fusion. It has now been 4 weeks since my l5-s1 fusion and I am doing fine. I have my ups and downs, but I don't walk with a limp. Some days I feel totally normal, but if I over do it, then I will feel a nerve, leg sensation, but not the pain, so I think it's just inflammation from overdoing it.
  • A minimum of 3 months off was what my surgeon told me in order to recover. A month is rediculious, in my opinion.

    I think you need to get an MRI w/contrast to find out what the heck is going on at this point. I get the whole "it takes time to heal nerves" thing, but muscle weakness is a red flag of something else being wrong possibly.

    At least it's not getting worse at this point, that's encouraging. #:S

    I hope it gets better, soon. Hang in there!
  • pepper09 said:
    Sorry to say but it sounds like you have a herniated disc.
    Hi Pepper09. That's the diagnosis that sent me to surgery: a herniated disc L5-S1, which was pinching the nerve root that drives the sciatica down one of my legs.

    In my case, it's not like I felt better after surgery, and then things got worse again. I feel after surgery exactly the same I felt before surgery, with some aggravated pain and odd sensations given the invasive procedure.

    It seems like it's back to square one for me.
  • Well, I've tried not to obsess about it, but things seem to have reached a plateau about 2 weeks ago (roughly around the 10-day review), and has remained the same since. Not getting better or worse, just the same:

    - Painful radiculopathy down the leg. Same as before, no improvement at all.
    - Major pain in the calf and ankle, which makes walking difficult and make me limp. Same as before.
    - Major stiffness and cramps in the morning, so much that it takes me a while every morning until I can walk.
    - Numbness still affects lower leg, heel and toes. It has not improved at all.
    - Weakness has not improved at all either: I can't tiptoe on the affected leg, or support my full bodyweight on it.

    I have called the doctor's a couple of times since, and they keep saying it's normal, and that it's probably caused by the healing process. That's all they keep saying, to give it time, yet the same doctors expected me to feel instant relief right out of surgery.

    I understand nerves require a lot of time to regenerate, and some people require more time than others to heal... but no improvement at all? No difference whatsoever to what it was before surgery? After all the pain and hassle of the process, (not to mention the storm of medical bill coming my way), I get nothing in return?

    This is incredibly frustrating.
    I have to return back to work this week, as the time allowed in short-term disability by my doctors (and employer) is coming to an end, and I feel like I have not accomplished anything. I’ll limp my way back to the office with no improvement, and the same pain as before. Lovely!

    On Edit:
    I just wanetd to add that one new thing I've been experiencing, which I wasn't feeling before the procedure, is stiffness and cramps on the other leg. Basically, now when I wake up, both my legs are in pain, numb, with cramps. I have no idea if this is a new thing I'm developing, or if it's something related to the operation.
  • Family Medical Leave Act,....I think they are more obligated then you may think....

    Good Luck and be good to yourself!
  • buckeyeback said:
    A minimum of 3 months off was what my surgeon told me in order to recover. A month is rediculious, in my opinion.
    (...)
    Thanks for the words of encouragement. I will definitely request a new MRI; it makes me feel weird they haven't asked for one already.

    Regarding the work leave situation, there's a couple of things going on:

    - Initially the doctors said I would need only 10 days leave. I thought it was way optimistic, but what do I know!
    After my first post-op review, they extended the leave a couple of extra weeks.

    - I work in a very competitive business environment, and given how poorly the economy has been performing, it may not be a good time to be off for too long. Although I'm covered by the short-term leave insurance, I'm afraid they may frown upon being on leave too long. You just never know, specially in this economic environment.

    Don't know if it's right or wrong. For what I've seen in these forums, some people are back on their feet within days of surgery. Some other people require months until they feel better. I don't know yet where I fall, but I know nothing has improved with surgery yet.
  • I wanted to give you guys an update and request any advise available.

    A couple of weeks ago I had a second post-op review with the surgeons. Nothing has improved since surgery, and now my other leg is affected too. The doctor requested a new MRI with contrast and a new EMG. These tests were performed over the last couple of weeks. I just got the results:

    - EMG: Nerve damage of S1 root. Before surgery, the prior EMG result was L5-S1 radiculopahty.

    - MRI with Contrast: Large mass of scar tissue compromising S1 nerve. In the film it looks like a large ball occupying the space that belonged to the herniated disc prior operation.

    The doctors have given me some corticoid medicine as a try, and will see me again next week.

    In the meantime, I am absolutely terrified, angry, and deeply depressed. I don't know what to do. Is this it? Am I screwed for life? How did this happen? Is there anything I can do?
  • There are ways to treat scar tissue that I am researching. My problem is that they are not sure (collectively) if that is my problem (read signature).

    "Julie" on this board had surgery to remove scar tissue in Jan 08 and is doing great now.

    Laser surgery is an option to remove scar tissue endoscopically,...google it!

    Systemic enzymes are a nutritional approach. Look up "Neprinol". These enzymes seek out dead cells (fibrosis) and eat them up essentially.

    "Lysis of Adhesions" is a cathater approach to chemically softer and deteriorate scar tissue. Look it up when you get a chance.

    Are you doing "nerve glides" to try and free up the nerve roots from letting scar tissue immobilize them? Ask your Pyhsical therapist.

    Let's stay in touch and beat this together. This can be beat!
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