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Interventional Pain Management

bigcat90bbigcat90 Posts: 1,012
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:39 AM in Pain Management
Has any one gone to this type of Pain Management before? i am going to this next month,is it the same as regular pain Mangement?


  • Yes, for all practical purposes. It is a specialty that physicians train for, just like becoming a dermatologist or an orthopedic surgeon. Many (maybe most?) current physicians working in pain management are anesthesiologists who branch out into pain management. Others are physiatrists...but some are trained specifically as interventional pain management physicians. I personally think they are the top of the heap, having the most specific, intensive training in all things pertaining to pain management.

    Hope this helps. You should be in good hands.

  • From my understanding these are less invasive and attempt to help us develop coping strategy for the future, a “collective approach” to managing pain has been suggested to be more successful, where each area of concern is identified and hopefully improved as a consequence.

    The use of CBT cognitive behaviour therapy is part of this process and help us develop alternative flight plans for our condition, all of this attempts to support change and enhance the tools we already have in coping with pain every day, as we do or have done.

    I went on a four week residential PM which used all the techniques in coping with the ongoing pain that I have, it attempts to manage our condition, it will not rectify the origin of your pain if preceding surgery has failed to be effective. It has a good success rate and any expertise directed toward us in coping may be beneficial.

    Good Luck, tell us how it goes….


    The challenge of pain / Ronald Melzack and Patrick D. Wall
  • Thnx everyone,i had my appointment today,it didnt go good,the doctor refused to do a rhizotomy on me,he wants me to go back to the doctor who did it in 2008,here is the bad part,they wouldnt let me see the pain doctor unless i signed a pain contract,i get my vicadin from my primary doctor,and i have signed a contract with him,i wasnt getting any pain meds from the new doctor,but i signed the contract,on the way out a nurse told me i had to do a urine test,i said why,she said because of my vicadin,the new doctor didnt prescribe my vicadin,i refused,she put her hand in my chest and tried to make me stay,i left at that point,i didnt say anything more ,my primary doctor is going to investigate,i was only going to have a rhizotomy done,and they wanted a urine test,i wont go back there, moral of this story is only sign a pain contract for the doctor that is prescribing your pain meds....
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