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Shin pain

jlrfryejjlrfrye ohioPosts: 1,110
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:43 AM in Chronic Pain
I am experiencing a new pain and wonder if any of the people with spine problems have experienced the same. Both of my shins from the knees down hurt something horrible today. Like a real deep ache. Could this be the start of a new problem or just something to add on to all my spine issues. Any feed back would be appreciated.


  • It sounds like you might have shin splints. I've copied and pasted some info:

    What are the symptoms of shin splints?
    Shin splints cause pain in the front of the outer leg below the knee. The pain of shin splints is characteristically located on the outer edge of the mid region of the leg next to the shin bone (tibia). An area of discomfort measuring 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) in length is frequently present. Pain is often noted at the early portion of the workout, then lessens only to reappear near the end of the training session. Shin splint discomfort is often described as dull at first. However, with continuing trauma, the pain can become so extreme as to cause the athlete to stop workouts altogether.

    Where do shin splints come from?
    A primary culprit causing shin splints is a sudden increase in distance or intensity of a workout schedule. This increase in muscle work can be associated with inflammation of the lower leg muscles, those muscles used in lifting the foot (the motion during which the foot pivots toward the tibia). Such a situation can be aggravated by a tendency to pronate the foot (roll it excessively inward onto the arch).

    Similarly, a tight Achilles tendon or weak ankle muscles are also often implicated in the development of shin splints.

    Of course, it's always best to check with your doctor to make sure nothing more serious isn't happening.

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