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I was informed on the si joint forum that this would be the place to get some info about the procedure.. I've been having lower back pain for a year now from a weight lifting accident and my dr said it was from lax ligaments.. Does anyone have any experience with the procedure? I would love to hear them because I'm considering it very much


  • Yes I have had prolotherapy 7 times for the sacroiliac ligaments in the lower back. I was injured by a physiotherapist manipulating my pelvis, and then I couldn't walk! It took me ages to find out what was wrong and how to treat it, because most doctors know next to nothing about this stuff. I joined a Facebook group for sufferers of Sacroiliac Dysfunction and discovered that prolotherapy was working for many people. Some people find it easier to take than others. I found it very painful but I am much more stable now. I think I may need a couple more treatments and was hoping to try Prolozone but can't find anyone to do it. It is supposed to be less painful. Do you have difficulty walking? If so it will probably be a sacroiliac injury.
  • If I put too much lordosis on my back when I walk it hurts, but other than that walking isn't too bad.. Standing in place for long periods of time are horrible though. Looking at it over all my pain isn't that bad compared to many on here so I feel bad asking for advice. I just have what feels like a stabbing\staining pull feeling when I move in certain ways. It's all in my si joint but I think my joint is still stable just constant pain every day. I'm going to try prolotherapy when I get back from a trip in a couple weeks.. I'm just glad I finally found a dr who is listening to me when I tell him where the pain is located.. Did you feel relief after the first session?
  • Sounds like you may only need 1 session if you are stable walking. If you are really unstable like me it takes 6 to 10 sessions and it is not pleasant!
  • and it's results are unproven. Basically, from my understanding it is injections of a sugar water injected into the muscles which causes an inflammatory response. I know that some of these procedures can take many , many injections if they work at all.
  • cdmboyccdmboy Posts: 3
    edited 10/28/2013 - 2:46 PM
    I had SI/low back prolotherapy after being injured on DRX-9000 decompression device. MedEx exercise equipment was also involved. From my experience, I can tell that SI joint can take a LOT of abuse before giving in. Also, lax SI ligaments are very hard to diagnose. Have you seen someone familiar with SOT (Sacro Occipital Technique) to determine if your SI is aligned and align it if needed? You could have knocked it out of alignment and it's now causing pain because it was misaligned for so long. If you decide to go for prolotherapy, you will have to have see that kind of specialist in addition to the injection doctor to make sure your SI stays in the correct position.

    Regarding the effectiveness of the prolotherapy. I was injured in March 2012. I lived in hell for 2 months: I could not keep any position for more than 5-10 minutes, I felt clicks in my pelvis when rolling in bed, I felt like the top of my body is not connected to the bottom part, I could not tolerate car rides longer than 15-20 min. This is what lax SI feels like. I was seen by the best specialist there is (without calling names). I had 6 sessions starting in May 2012, 2-3 weeks apart. I had little or no progress before starting the injections. I was told that the recovery will take 1 year. By September I felt that not all is lost. By November I started playing tennis lightly, with no running.

    You have to find a good doctor to do the injections. Many people that are doing injections are shady and are not compassionate about your recovery. You have to have normal levels of testosterone as it almost directly determines how well you can regenerate the tissue. You have to eat well and have adequate protein intake. All that a good doctor should tell you before starting the injection protocol.
  • It is painful but the pain relief afterwards is awesome. In fact, you will have to be willing to suffer some awful pain to get the relief. You’ll see great result and get more stability.
  • 1sacrum11sacrum Posts: 1
    edited 09/02/2014 - 10:45 PM
    Been misdiagnosed and robbed of my life for over a year. I've tried everything from hanging upside down, physical therapy, steroid injections, etc. The ONLY thing working is PRP & Prolotherapy!!! Just had round #3
    Do it! is all I can say.
  • Another vote here. I know all the research is not confirmed but anybody I know who has had it done, including myself has found relief where no one else could help. A lot of the time I think the research crews find it hard to agree that a little sugar and water can make such a difference. It would put surgeons and docs out of business. The key factor in it though is who treats you. There seem to be a lot of people out there who don't know what they are doing so you need to find people who do this all day every day and not as a small part of their practice. Also there are a few types but I had the Hemwell Hackett type which is a lot of injections (70-80). It seems to ensure the injury is treated as some places only give two or three injections so it is hit and miss.

    It is painful bit well worth it.

    Eoin. Ireland
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