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Is it just me, or anyone else dislike...

I can't help but dislike my pharmacist and staff! Everytime I go there to pick up my pain pills I feel like they are like oh here's the pill popper again.. They are extremely rude. I don't know if I'm taking this way to personally but I'm pretty sure the next time I get the snooty pharmacist or tech I will say something to the manager. I almost feel the need to tell them what my problems are just so they don't think I'm just a person who takes narcotics for fun! I could also switch pharmacies but why should I have to. This one is by my house. I just feel that the pharmacist has a stick in her butt and needs to have aittle more compassion. I'm only 28 so maybe she thinks the worst, but that's non of her business or is it? Do you think I should tell them all my surgeries and past history to make them not so rude?
Thanks!
28 F. Chicago. Fusion from t-12 l-4 from scoli in June 2013. Torn bilateral hip labrums. Arthroscopy to fix labrums January 2013 and march 2013. SI pain from hip surgery Lupus, RA, antiphosphidlipid antibody- hypermobility syndrome ( Marfan syndrome)
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Comments

  • mjd210mmjd210 Posts: 92
    edited 02/06/2014 - 12:34 PM
    We must go to the same pharmacy because I feel the same way at mine! I don't say anything because if they want to pass judgment on someone they don't even know they are ignorant and they are not someone I would associate with. Just smile and kill them with kindness.
    alif l4-s1
  • I wouldn't tell them anything.... after all, "justifying" doesn't shed a favorable light unless you plan to expose your scars and hand over medical documents.... After all, you already have "justification" because you have a script signed by a doctor. and FYI I pharmacist doesn't have to fill a script and doesn't have to give a reason.... I'd like to think just because you challenged their attitude they wouldn't take it personally and decide not to fill your meds anymore... but some people are just like that.
    33yo mom of two. My surgical history...preadolescence scoliosis, kyphosis, and a hot mess.... 5 spine surgeries and lots of items added I wasn't born with (titanium, peek, surgical steel). Guess cremation is out. TSA loves me.
  • I always feel a bit self conscious when filling a script for 90 norco pills. I know I shouldn't, but I get a stare once in a while, like "why does this young woman need all these?" It's been a little better now that I'm sporting a lumbar brace, but I am pretty insecure anyways.
    2015: Thoracic protrusions C7-T1, T3-4, T6-8
    Dec'13: 360FusionL4-S1 w/bone graft
    2013: 3x2-level disc injections: 12mo surgery postponement
    Dec'12: DiscogramL4-S1
    Sep/Oct'12: Bi-lateral Rhizo AblationsL4- S1
  • RTgirl2011RRTgirl2011 Posts: 512
    edited 02/06/2014 - 3:09 PM
    I wouldn't tell them anything. It's none of their business. I take several meds for Bipolar disorder. The pharmacy where I go have seen at my worst and my best. I think that is why they are on a first name basis with me. Maybe they think I am so crazy I may go off on them one day. Who knows. I haven't had to explain or justify anything to them. Nor have I felt the need too. I used to get 150 Norco at a time when I was going to a pain doc. I get enormous amounts of Valium, antidepressants, and anti-psychotics from my shrink. Your meds are between you and your doctor.

    Jennifer
    Discectomies 05/08 and 04/11, fusions L4-5 Feb 9,2012 and L3-L4 June 28,2012, Staph infection washout 3/2/2012, Bulged L5-S1. SCS trial on January 17th, 2014, which was a success! Permanent SCS on February 20th.
  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 10,060
    (if you dont mind me calling your that)
    This is a product of our times. 10 years ago, you would never have seen or even heard of this. But the DEA has cracked down on the improper distribution of narcotic medications. Some of that came from doctors who had no problem writing scripts for whatever. I remember back in the early 80's, I was having some back problems. I went to see this doctor and he wrote a script for 100 Tylox. The next appointment, I told him I was feeling somewhat better, and then he wrote a script for 200 Tylox.

    That was abuse... Then we had the drug seekers, who would go from doctor to doctor, pharmacist to pharmacist to get their narcotic pain medication.

    As a result, the DEA has made it tougher on everyone. The doctors need to be able to justify and provide rationale for any narcotic medication they write a script for. The pharmacist then has to fill those scripts, but they take another look at previous records and to see if they feel the medications match up to the patients problems. That is unfortunate, because it places a burden on the pharmacist to play doctor and that is not fair.

    But who really suffers? Its you, the patient who is only looking to get their medications that their doctors feel is necessary. But when you go into a pharmacist, many times you are viewed as that 'drug seeker' That is so wrong. And if you talk to a supervisor, you will probably get the same results.

    This happens not only to younger folks (which they are the targets) but to us older, hmm, elderly, hmmm wiser? ok more experienced folks. The difference here is that if I get challenged, i tell them Ok, I can understand this from your point of view, but lets get on the phone right now to talk to the doctor. Then attitudes begin to change. They may say, well the doctor is busy, ok, my response is thats fine, but since you challenge me, go ahead and interrupt them. Oh and by the way, if they are busy, I will be glad to tell them that you did not trust what was prescribed to me, so they wanted your actual ok

    The sad thing about that is that I can say that and the pharmacist will listen, when younger folks say it, the pharmacist believe they are in the drivers seat and want you to prove everything. That is so wrong.
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: rdilauro@veritashealth.com
  • jlrfryejjlrfrye ohioPosts: 1,110
    I use a family owned store along with every member of my family. They know what is wrong with me and treat me with respect, They go out of their way for my family. While my mother was passing we ran out of morphine in the middle of the night and unfortunately the only all night pharmacy is in the next town in a very dangerous section, Actual police escort those into the store at night. Our regular pharmacist heard of the situation, stopped by our house with their personal home phone number and told us they didnt care if it was the middle of the night, if we ran out again call and someone would meet us there. How great is that! When I drop my scripts off and bad weather is expected they deliver my scripts to my home. They go well above their job to satisfy a customer. Even have received get well cards from them during recovery of my surgeries. I wouldnt trade them for the world
    Susan
    I know alot of people feel it is none of their business what is wrong with you and feel made to be a drug seeker. I guess from being in the medical field sometimes its just easier to explain your situation then deal with the rudeness I guess from being in the medical field sometimes its just easier to explain your situation then deal with the rudeness
  • broken77bbroken77 Posts: 37
    edited 02/07/2014 - 5:06 AM
    Geez the pharmacist is the only one I like...on the other hand I hate my surgeon he was the nicest guy in the world before the surgery ...now he avoids me like he owes me money !
  • Pharmacists should love us back patients...job security!! I kid. But really it's kind of true, why would they ever want to treat their customers like that? Business is business, and they are in it for the money.
  • Danigirl123DDanigirl123 Posts: 60
    edited 02/11/2014 - 1:18 PM
    @ Dilauro, so the doctor has to tell the pharmacy what is wrong with us? Like they give them our medical background? Is that what you mean? I for one love the technicians wether they are secretly judging me or not they are nice to my face...but this one pharmacist.. She is nasty! Even on the phone she's rude to me. It's not like I'm picking up 150 OxyContin every 2 weeks along with morphine patches.. I'm picking up the lowest dose of norco. Anyways.. Thanks for all of your response. I guess in a way I want to tell them everything that is wrong with me and prove to them I'm not a "drug seeker." But everyone has a good point, it's not their business. And if it was required then they would have our medical history. Thanks again everyone. Just thought maybe I was the only one that felt alittle uuneasy about the pharmacy.
    28 F. Chicago. Fusion from t-12 l-4 from scoli in June 2013. Torn bilateral hip labrums. Arthroscopy to fix labrums January 2013 and march 2013. SI pain from hip surgery Lupus, RA, antiphosphidlipid antibody- hypermobility syndrome ( Marfan syndrome)
  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 10,060
    No, that is not what my post was saying. I apologize if that is the message you received. What I am trying to say is that all doctors need to provide justification and rationale for prescribing narcotic pain medications.
    The pharmacist on the other end id filling a prescription written by a doctor. If they see something that is wrong, they will challenge that. Maybe not directly with you, the patient, but with the doctor.
    I recently had a total hip replacement. On my discharge, the list of medications including 20mg of Oxycontin 3x day, along with 20mg of Oxycodone for breakthrough. As my recovery was going along, the need for that level of pain medication was no longer required.

    The next prescription was written for 10mg of Oxycodone. The pharmacist did not actually challenge that, but we had discussions on what I am going to do with the 20mg, now that the new script was written for 10mg. To me, that was good, it was a system of check and balances.

    The pharmacist does not need to know what exactly our condition is.. Just that there is a need for specific pain medications. Our condition could be a spinal problem (like most of us), but could also be a broken leg, a split finger, etc
    So, the pharmacist does not need to know the details.

    Does that clear up what I was saying before?
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: rdilauro@veritashealth.com
  • I have the best relationship with my pharmacist. My pharmacist saw me just after my accident and has been filling my scripts for years. He advised me to stay with him and my current GP even though I have moved about 100 klms away. Pharmacists usually have an idea what is wrong with you. They know what meds are used for, that's their profession.

    I am looking after my parents as they are ill and have met their pharmacist so many times, my mum talks a lot so they know my parents really well. I had to take my dad to the Dr the other day to fix his meds and I asked the his Dr if he would be willing to prescibe me the medications I am on. I thought I would have to go through the nightmare again of getting restricted pain medications.

    I explained the situation and he said yes straight away (he knows I am here looking after my parents). Now I know the pharmacists that my parents use they said yes as well. So now because of my parents I have a new Dr and pharmacist so I don't have to travel for my scripts.

    I know pharmacies are larger in the US but I make a point of getting to know at least the pharmacist and a couple of the girls personally. Hey I have a broken back - who cares if they know - they can tell anyway, I am in so much pain some days and they grab me a seat. One of the girls gives me books and we have a chat about lots of stuff while I am waiting. I know a lot of her personal stuff and she knows some of mine. But never blab it to other people.

    My old pharmacist became friends with me - they know what is wrong, pharmacies usually work in consultation with the Dr's here so they know all the Dr's and give them a call if there are problems.

    In Australia a pharmacist cannot refuse to fill a script a Dr has written, they work in collaboration with the Drs and the pharmacies are normally in close proximity to the Drs surgery.

    I think it is really important they know me as a person. Much easier - it is their business - they are dispensing meds and hopefully check contraindications. I honestly don't have a problem with them knowing. In fact it's better if they know me, and why I need the meds. My old pharmacist even vouched for me when I went interstate and had to get a repeat script. So did my GP.

    I don't know your system - I know some of the pharmacies in the US can be in chain stores - which doesn't happen here, so here you get the same pharmacist every time and they probably have my records. I am happy they know what happened to me - I really get on well with them so if it was me I would get to know one pharmacist really well, explain why you need the meds - i think it is their business - they are professionals - and because I know everyone now no-one makes me feel at all guilty about my meds. I know from work if someone came to see me face to face I could help them more and understand their situation if they were more than just another number.

  • terror8396tterror8396 Posts: 1,831
    edited 02/12/2014 - 5:07 AM
    my 2 cents but i think sometimes people are self conscious and read things into people that are not there. maybe some of you think they are snooty because you are picking up narcotics. i am not saying it does not happen but a lot of people are conditioned to believe narcotics are bad and they feel that people think the same about them when picking up a script. i have been going to the same pharmacy for 13 years and they do a lot and i mean a lot of compounding for chronic pain patients. they are used to it and they know all of the pain doctors around so there are no bad vibes. they are very friendly and accommodating and if there is a problem they will tell you and call the doctor. they are next to a hospital and most pain doctors in the area, a big city next to san francisco so everyone goes to them especially since they compound narcotics. they are a bit pricy but accommodating.
    jon
    I have 4 fusions from L5-3, the latest last May '12 where they fixed my disc that broke.They went through my side this time. I take 40 mg of oxycontin 4x a day and 4 fenatyl lollipops 300 micro gms 4x a day.
  • before my first surgery, I was using a rather large, nationally known chain of pharmacies. We have six people in my family, and were customers of theirs for at least 10 years.....with 4 kids, and the flu, ear infections, etc , we were known there....about a year after my first surgery, while I was dealing with a surgically incurred spinal cord injury, the chain brought in a new pharmacist, just graduated from pharmacy school. I was using a walker to get around, and never filled early, never changed the medications or dosages that I was on, filled every 30 days, like clockwork......and she decided that she didn't want to fill the prescriptions. She flat out lied to me that the meds were not in stock...........the first month, I wound up going to another pharmacy...then she did it the second month, and the third...so I waited until she was off shift, after trying to fill my scripts which she claimed were not in stock- 15 minutes after her shift ended, I went back in, and the pharmacy manager was there, who filled my scripts with no issue, so I asked about the shortages. Come to find out the new pharmacist did not want to deal with narcotic scripts so she told customers that the meds weren't in....
    I was furious, and wound up leaving that particular chain. Since, I have used a small , neighborhood pharmacy, and never once had any issues whatsoever with the whole transaction.
    The bottom line is that any pharmacist can refuse to fill and they do not have to give a reason.....but I am of the opinion that while they may have the right to refuse , I have the right to change where I choose to spend my money.
  • I laughed when the manager came out and asked me why I needed so many.

    If you want to file a complaint do it on the pharmacy website or call corporate office. The manager of the prescription center is not the store manager. Plus the manager is usually the same person who filled your prescription and they don't care how you feel.
    SarahLindeau said:
    I always feel a bit self conscious when filling a script for 90 norco pills. I know I shouldn't, but I get a stare once in a while, like "why does this young woman need all these?" It's been a little better now that I'm sporting a lumbar brace, but I am pretty insecure anyways.
  • this is why i never will go to a big time pharmacy. i will stay with my neighborhood one and who have known me for 13 years. sadi, i was also liked to by a big time one who also said they did not have my med in stock. they also lied. if you go into a big time one and give them a big time narcotic script, they look like they are being robbed. i went to one at one time but they knew me from previous scripts but when i gave them the narcotic script, there was no issue.
    jon
    I have 4 fusions from L5-3, the latest last May '12 where they fixed my disc that broke.They went through my side this time. I take 40 mg of oxycontin 4x a day and 4 fenatyl lollipops 300 micro gms 4x a day.
  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 10,060
    edited 02/12/2014 - 6:32 PM
    but it is irritating. You come to imagine that IF your doctor will go ahead and write a prescription for a narcotic medication, then the pharmacy should go ahead and execute the doctor's request.

    I think the key word here is pharmacy vs pharmacist. As in the situation with Sandi, it wasnt so much about the pharmacy chain, but the individual pharmacist that caused the trouble.

    I used to use the small neighborhood pharmacist, but just like old fashion barbers, they have been driven out and replaced by chains. But we have been fortunate. and never had a problem with the big chain pharmacy here. In fact, I have had to use two of them because of out of stock medication. I did have one problem with a pharmacist who refuse to fill a prescription.

    At the time I was on Oxycontin and Oxycodone. I had a prescription for a refill of the Oxycodone, but the pharmacist stated that I just had that filled 10 days before (that was the Oxycontin) I explained to him the difference, but he acted like there was no difference between the medications. I just told him , please then call my insurance company, here is the number... He stalled, and I told him again, call. He did , in front of me, and of course, he was incorrect and my script was then filled. But that was the only time.
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: rdilauro@veritashealth.com
  • Yes! Thank you! Believe me, with the war on drugs going on right now and addiction rate gettin higher and higher for any sort of drug not just pain pills I do understand their cause for concern.. However like most people have said..the pharmacist is just that and if she wanted to be a doctor she should have persued that. I'm just kinda over the whole feeling like a jerk when I go get my meds. I have been on pain pills for awhile now.. I had bi lateral hip surgery in January of 2013 then in March then in June my fusion. So for all these pharmacist know I'm just going to docotr to doctor. That's why I kinda want to say.. Oh I had 3 surgeries in less than 6 months.
    Thanks again for clearlifing! Hope your hip recovery is going well.
    28 F. Chicago. Fusion from t-12 l-4 from scoli in June 2013. Torn bilateral hip labrums. Arthroscopy to fix labrums January 2013 and march 2013. SI pain from hip surgery Lupus, RA, antiphosphidlipid antibody- hypermobility syndrome ( Marfan syndrome)
  • the pharmacist has an idea of what's wrong just based on what you take. Like Jennifer, I am on multiple psychiatric medications. It took two psychiatrists two years to find the right cocktail of drugs for me. Along the way, I had medication changes, dosage changes, and it was frustrating. I'm sure since they know I take a powerful dose of an anti-psychotic that I have psychotic episodes. I take two anti-depressants. Pretty obvious I'm depressed. A mood stabilizer - again, psychiatric drug. And an anti-anxiety. So I have anxiety.

    I used to be so apprehensive about going to the pharmacy. I felt like everyone laughed at the psycho girl. But once I actually paid attention to the people working there, I saw how professional they were about it. They never announced my drugs by name, they show me the printouts to confirm they filled what I wanted. They're very discreet when they're handing me five prescription bottles at once. They slide them into one of my grocery bags for me so no one else has to see a big bag. Things like that.

    Now that my cocktail is stable (plus I take Neurontin now for nerve pain), I feel a lot better about going to the pharmacy. I can totally understand why you feel apprehensive about picking up pain prescriptions. But when you're on an acceptable dose, you shouldn't worry about it. It should just be another prescription to the pharmacists. I dealt with a rude pharmacist once on an otherwise great pharmacy team. I put the conflict onto him - thought in my head that he obviously needed a new career. If they're rude to you, chances are they're rude to others too and you're not the only target.
    ____________________________________________
    (see profile for medical details)

    I *heart* my TENS unit.
  • Real Professionals do not act like this danigirl. Forget the DEA and all the seekers at the clinic you go to. If you have a legitimate problem why worry?
    Dogwalker
  • @doglover. Your absolutely right. I do have a legitimate reason. I shouldn't care what some pharmacist thinks of me. I guess people just put in my head that narcotics are soooo bad and if you are on them your a junky. Which is sad. The way I feel is, I guess there's a difference between someone who is looking to get a high and someone who is looking for legit pain relief. The problem is, the people who are getting pain pills from doctors that don't have a legitimate reason and that in return makes people like me look bad. I'm only 28 and have a list of medical problems that can go on.. Not to mention I'm looking at a revision spinal fusion surgery in June. We can go on and on about this, but bottom line is I shouldn't care. I shouldn't have to justify to anyone but my doctor why I take a pain pill. Pharmacist included! Thanks again for all yor post! It made me feel better about this situation. Maybe next time like PP said.. Kill them with kindness. Or I'll just walk in there and show them all my scars and see if they then maybe feel bad.. Lol.
    28 F. Chicago. Fusion from t-12 l-4 from scoli in June 2013. Torn bilateral hip labrums. Arthroscopy to fix labrums January 2013 and march 2013. SI pain from hip surgery Lupus, RA, antiphosphidlipid antibody- hypermobility syndrome ( Marfan syndrome)
  • dfhughes57ddfhughes57 Posts: 32
    edited 03/16/2014 - 5:49 AM
    broken77 said:
    Geez the pharmacist is the only one I like...on the other hand I hate my surgeon he was the nicest guy in the world before the surgery ...now he avoids me like he owes me money !
    Wow you juts described my surgeon wonder if we had the same one ;-)

    To be honest all I care about is managing my pain so I can do things like go to work and earn a living, I do not give a rats ass and cares not what anyone thinks period. They do not know me or my medical condition.

  • I have the same same problem with mine I am 30 years old and have been on lortabs for a few years now and when I had my TLIF 4days ago the surgeon gave me oxycodone 10 they have always looked at me funny because I am so young and on my good days becore surgery you couldnt tell there was anything wrong with me, but after I took those new scripts from the surgeon they acted like they didn't want to fill them because I had already filled my other meds at the beginning of the month and I still had to pay $220 for them when I have insurance. So yes I ce for sure understand
    Kimberly taylor
  • I was in the NS office for a post op on Thursday and the PA was going to call me in some pain meds. When I told her which pharmacy (large chain) she said she hoped it wasn't the one that was no longer dispensing narcotics. They had just found one earlier that day that was doing that. She seemed completely mystified on how or why a pharmacy would do that. I only knew from being on here that it had been a problem. Luckily it wasn't my pharmacy.
  • Well Danigirl123, I have been going to the same pharmacist since 1990, and I never liked the guy. Very rude, and almost threw the meds at me. Never a "have a nice day" or anything like that, just a bunch of grunts. After almost falling flat on my face, when he all of sudden spoke nice to me (around Feb 2007), and started treated me like a human being we became pretty close. We would share memories, pictures of vacations, etc. What a turnaround. So, one day back in 2009, I went to him and he was gone. I asked where he went, and someone said another state/another store. I couldn't believe it, but this always happens to me. So to make a long story short Danigirl123...."I WANT MY PHARMACIST BACK". LOL
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