Here are 2 little-known treatments to relieve pain in your lower back or leg caused by dysfunction in your sacroiliac joint:

Either too much or too little movement in your sacroiliac joint can lead to leg and/or back pain.
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Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction Video

1. Activity modification

Sometimes the simplest remedies are the best ones; and this is the case when it comes to modifying your activities to relieve sacroiliac joint dysfunction symptoms.

See Treatment Options for Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

The guideline for activity modification is simple: Avoid any tasks that provoke your lower back and/or leg symptoms. Every person is different, but many people find that sitting, lying down, and walking up flights of stairs exacerbates their sacroiliac joint pain. Less commonly, you may find that low-impact activities like walking provoke your symptoms.

To minimize your pain, you will need to make lifestyle adjustments to find relief from your symptoms. Below are several suggestions to help get you started:

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2. Sacroiliac joint belts

Excessive and/or abnormal movement in your sacroiliac joint is referred to as hypermobility. If your doctor determines that hypermobility is the cause of your lower back and/or leg pain, she or he may recommend you wear a sacroiliac joint belt.

See Sacroiliac Joint Anatomy

These belts (also referred to as sacral and/or pelvic belts) limit the movement in your sacroiliac joint by fitting snugly around your pelvis. Sacroiliac joint belts can sometimes be worn 24 hours per day, but it is advised you first speak with your doctor before wearing the belt to bed.

See Adjunctive Therapy for Sacroiliac Joint Pain

Purchasing a sacroiliac joint belt can feel overwhelming, as there are numerous varieties sold by a number of different companies. For example, some manufacturers ask for your measurements and then create a belt specifically fitted for you, while others sell belts in general sizes (e.g. small or medium). To help you narrow your search for a belt, ask your doctor if he or she has a particular brand of belt they recommend.

When the belt arrives, most companies will include detailed instructions on how to wear it, but if you have any further questions you can schedule a follow-up appointment with your doctor to ensure you are using the belt properly.

I hope all of the above information will help you better communicate with your doctor about your treatment options; which in turn will set you on a quicker path to healing.

See Accurate Diagnosis of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Learn more:

All About Sacroiliitis

Sacroiliac Joint Injection

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