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Need to understand MRI report and respective treatment

Schmorls nodes noted at multiple levels of lumbar spine.

Diffuse disc bulge noted at L3-L4 level causing anterior thecal sac indentation and 

bilateral mild neural foraminal narrowing without significant nerve root

compression.

Diffuse disc bulge noted at L4-L5 level causing anterior thecal sac indentation and 

bilateral severe lateral recess and neural foraminal narrowing with impingment of 

bilateral exiting nerve roots.

Disc desiccation with diffuse disc bulge and right paracentral / foraminal disc 

protrusion noted at L5-S1 level causing anterior thecal sac indentation with mild to 

moderate spinal canal narrowing and bilateral severe lateral recess and neural 

foraminal narrowing (R > L) with compression of traversing and exiting nerve root

on right side and exiting nerve root on left side.

Sacroiliac Joints - Appear normal. 

Cervicodorsal Spine Screening:

Loss of cervical lordosis with straightening.

Hemangioma noted at D1 vertebral body.

IMPRESSION:

Diffuse disc bulge at L3-L4 level causing anterior thecal sac indentation and 

bilateral mild neural foraminal narrowing without significant nerve root

compression.

Diffuse disc bulge at L4-L5 level causing anterior thecal sac indentation and 

bilateral severe lateral recess and neural foraminal narrowing with impingment

of bilateral exiting nerve roots.

Disc desiccation with diffuse disc bulge and right paracentral / foraminal disc 

protrusion at L5-S1 level causing anterior thecal sac indentation with mild to 

moderate spinal canal narrowing and bilateral severe lateral recess and neural 

foraminal narrowing (R > L) with compression of traversing and exiting nerve 

root on right side and exiting nerve root on left side.


Please help me to understand this. Below are queries.

1. Is surgery is necessary.

2. How much effective is ayurvedic treatment.

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Comments

  • Surajbora

    No one on the forum is medically qualified to read nor give advice based off of the doctors findings.All advice given is from persinal experience only.

    Respectfully:rule 6.02 You agree not to ask for any analysis or interpretation of diagnostic tests (ie MRI, CTScans, EMG, etc.),

    William Garza
    Spine-Health Mod
    erator

    Welcome to Spine-Health

  • MeyattMMeyatt New YorkPosts: 47

    As said above, we're not doctors or qualified to be interpreting one another's MRIs. If you read the topics here, you'll know that the decision for surgery is a complicated one with a lot of variables between the patient and the doctor that include but aren't limited to:

    • What's the pathology of the pain (how does it present, what does it feel like to the patient)
    • What's the patient's age
    • What's their quality of life
    • What modalities have they tried 
    • Are they able to work
    • How long have they been having the pain
    • What's the chance surgical intervention can actually 

    And MRI, one way or the other, isn't a clear map to surgery. Yes, MRIs and X-Rays are miracles and allow doctors to catch extremely serious diseases, but they are clinically very imprecise for low back pain. Some people walk around with terrible hernias and disc desiccation without pain, others have slight protrusions and have excruciating pain. I'd suggest you try a bit of independent research on how an MRI is used with back pain and talk with your doctor about how they view the results.

    Back pain has a lot of causes, surgery is really the last resort and it's something that can't be undone. As for the Ayurvedic treatment — some people will swear by anti-inflammatory diets but there isn't clinical research that supports it. There's no harm in trying, but I'd really encourage you do it in combination with other conservative treatment like physical therapy, exercise if tolerated, and diet changes to reduce weight if that's a factor.

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