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GP refusing to give higher dose of medications

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2

Comments

  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 11,921

    @stratfordavons

    Being involved with spinal situations almost all my life, I always find it disturbing when doctors tell they patients their are either too young for opioids or too young for surgery.

    Pain and spinal problems have never discriminated regarding age.  Some one as young as 10 can have a severe spinal problem as well as someone 70 having the same problem.

    So doctors will treat the 70 year old with all type of medications and surgery, but for the under 25, nope, they are too young..  TOO  YOUNG FOR WHAT?  For pain?  When you have pain, you have pain, if you are 3 or 93.    Its up to the doctor to determine the correct course of action.  They can always give you lower dosages of pain medications to see if that helps and can schedule all sorts of conservative treatments to try to correct the situation.

    Being too young should never be used as an excuse.   Look at it the other way, one surgeon did 9 of my spinal surgeries.   Now, he is about the same age as I am (67)   By that time, reflexes slow down, you are not quite as sharp as you were 20 years ago.   At my last lumbar surgery in 2016. I wouldn't even consider this surgeon, even though he did me good for almost 20 years.

    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: rdilauro@veritashealth.com
  • Hi @dilauro thank you for your comment. I couldn't agree more to everything you said!! I am sick of being told I'm too young to be given certain doses / prescribed certain medications. The last time I visited my GP, I explained that all of my current medication that I am on is having a very minimal affect to my pain and that I simply needed something stronger as my daily life is heavily affected by my pain levels and I just can't cope with the amount of pain I'm in everyday.  His exact response to me was "look, if you where 40, 50, 60 years old I would have no choice but to prescribe opioids and would also be giving other things regularly for you to try. But because you are so young, although you may not feel it, I can't prescribe you anything stronger because I do not want you to become addicted." I honestly could have cried when he said that. It makes me feel as though he doesn't believe the amount of pain I'm in. I've been on strong pain meds for my age since I was 12 years old for pain, I would completely have understood a response like that at that age but as a 20 year old I just can't accept that the right choices are being made for me. It's not like I want to be on all of these medications, but I have no other choice. It's just so frustrating to me that I know their are medications out there that could help me but I'm just not being given any. 

    I'm sorry to hear you have had so many surgeries, but I'm glad you are sharing your knowledge with me. Hope you are keeping well. Thanks again. 

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