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Pain medication while in the hospital

pepper09ppepper09 Posts: 138
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:30 AM in Back Surgery and Neck Surgery
It's been 5 weeks since my surgery and I'm still thinking about my hospital stay for 2 1/2 days and I can't believe that they only gave me hydrodone for pain after my surgery while I was in the hospital. Is that normal? I kept calling the nurse for more pain meds, but that is all they gave me. During those 2 1/2 days, they only gave me 2 shots of morphine. I have been on hydrocodone for 5 months and it didn't take care of the surgery pain I had. What types of meds did you all have while in the hospital?
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1

Comments

  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 13,531
    doctor who puts in for the prescription for pain medications. The nurses just follow the instructions given by the doctor. During some of my different hospital stays, I've had the nurses contact my doctor because the medication they were given me didnt help with the pain

    During my last surgery in 2000, the pain medication was Tylox
    Generic names: oxycodone and acetaminophen
    Brand names: Percocet, Roxicet, Tylox, Endocet

    Much has changed since then, many patients use the morphine drip and/or dilaudid.

    But again, that is your doctors decision on what we be used.
    The hospital staff can not change any medications without first receiving approval from the doctor and/or his/her associate.
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences 
  • Just had a ACDF last week and got Dilaudid drip. I can't take anything with codine. Now I'm on Darvocet, but have dropped it and am just going with Tylenol. Those pills make me just too depressed and now is the time to be positive!
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  • My hospital stay when I had my 2 level fusion was a little bit of a blur, but I do know that my surgeon had me on a PCA machine which dispensed morphine whenever I pressed the button. They had me on Phenergan for nausea, the anesthesiologist made sure my Fentanyl patches was changed on schedule, occasional Dilaudid injections were given, and they gave me Valium for muscle spasms. I left with a script for Norco 10 mg (2 tablets every 4 hours), 10 mg Valium, and my Fentanyl was bumped up to 50 mcg.

    I am a surprised that's all you were given, esp. after fusion surgery. In my experience the pain was very intense, and the drainage tube in my back didn't help matters. I never went to the bathroom during my stay because I was cathed the whole time there. I wasn't made to go walking with PT either. I guess it was because I was in ICU.

    How did you manage with all that post op pain? Did you ask the nurses if they would page the surgeon? He is the only one that can order a different medication if another doesn't work for you. I'm sorry you had a hard time after your fusion. Take care

  • Of mine is that when we are least able to fight for ourselves they leave us, to fight for ourselves. It seems to happen most with doctors who have a thing against pain meds, they under prescribe to people. They do not take into account the tolerances we have built up. They treat our pain as if we are a fresh injury, never taken anything but baby aspirin our whole lives!

    They did the exact same thing to me when I had my shoulder replacement surgery. I had been on percocet up to the operation. So they cut me, pull my arm out of the socket, drill into the bone, place a cap on the end of the bone and reassemble me. So, what happens? they wake me up to percocet!!! Duh, talk about complaining! I moaned and groaned and had a fit till they finally ended up with dilaudid and the percocets! I was still miserable, and awake for two nights straight.

    If we do not have the strength to strap on our boots and complain they just let us lie there, in pain.


    Well, I guess I said my piece on this topic....
    Not much help I know, only serves to mention that you are not the only one it has happened to!

    I have my SCS surgery on May 4th and I know it is nothing like the shoulder replacement, but I'm chicken and gunshy. I'm already buggin my PCP to be sure I will be cared for if I need it. I have to talk to the PM on Thursday and will hopefully know exactly how and who to call if I have trouble the days after surgery. No more of this "I wonder who to call" stuff for me!
  • I had a strange pain regimen but it worked while the nurses kept up on it.

    Was given 20mg hydrocodone immediately of entering the ortho room. Then it was every 3 hours 6mg morphine IV and every 2-3 hours 20mb hydrocodone if I recall correctly.

    The morphine worked faster of course being IV but the lortab (hydrocodone) lasted longer which meant I needed less pain meds overall.

    Dilaudid is really overused and abused a lot and should be a drug of last choice (such as being allergic to certain meds).

    And sometimes nurses get anal and try to get patients off of pain shots too early. Usuaully the first day and a half pain shots are given after that switch to PO as to prevent withdrawl and tolerance.
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  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 13,531
    Before you go in for you SCS, discuss the medication plan with your doctor. I am sure you will reach a happy medium
    They might suggest Option A, and you might say, ok, but if Option A doesnt work, I want Option B and so on.
    If this is in place BEFORE the surgery, then when you are out on the floors, the hospital staff will be able to react to your request quickly, since it was previously stated.
    Saves a lot of time and saves you a lot of pain
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences 
  • I didn't sleep for two nights either. The second night I would doze off for a few minutes and wake up in a sweat. I kept dreaming that the pain wasn't mine and I shouldn't be in the hospital. The second morning I was just drenched in sweat and everyone who would come in the room said it was freezing in my room. I think I was just in so much pain and all that sweating and weird dreams were just symptoms of my pain.

    I felt my back just pressing against the hospital bed and it felt like my whole insides were just crunched up like I was holding my stomach and back muscles the entire time. It felt like my back was going to explode. I can't explain it very well, but I think I felt the entire surgical raw pain for 2 days and it was traumatic for me.

    I didn't have a very nice nurse the first morning after my surgery and when I kept telling her how much pain I was in she would just say that people tolerate pain differently. She would ask what level of pain I was in and I would say a 7 or 8 and she would say that there is no way I could be in that much pain. Then in a threatening way (in my opinion) she would say that she was going to call my doctor. And then I said no, that it was ok. Then for the entire time that I was in the hospital, I just zoned out. I just accepted the hydrocodone that they gave me and one nurse when I asked for my next dose of hydrocodone said (and my husband was there as a witness) that she was there to legally be a drug dealer and said it was my lucky day.

    So I had two nurses who did not believe the pain I was in and they both belittled me. Maybe that's why the second night when I was in and out of sleep that I kept dreaming that it wasn't my pain and I didn't belong in the hospital.

    Sorry, I just had to vent and I don't talk to anyone about my experience in the hospital. It helps me to vent here though.

    However, once I got home the pain got less and less each day and now that I am almost 5 weeks post op I am happy to say that I am doing great with occasional pains once in awhile if I over do it.
  • dilauro said:
    doctor who puts in for the prescription for pain medications. The nurses just follow the instructions given by the doctor. During some of my different hospital stays, I've had the nurses contact my doctor because the medication they were given me didnt help with the pain

    During my last surgery in 2000, the pain medication was Tylox
    Generic names: oxycodone and acetaminophen
    Brand names: Percocet, Roxicet, Tylox, Endocet

    Much has changed since then, many patients use the morphine drip and/or dilaudid.

    But again, that is your doctors decision on what we be used.
    The hospital staff can not change any medications without first receiving approval from the doctor and/or his/her associate.
    I think the doctors give the nurses too much responsibility caring for patients after surgery. In my case, I think I just had communication problems with a couple of nurses and thought they were threatening me when they said the were going to call my doctor.....like they didn't believe I was in so much pain and needed stronger medication. I feel really stupid now because that is probably all it would have taken was a phone call to my doctor. But, why do the doctors only check on you once a day and early in the morning when you are incoherent? And then all they want to do is send you home as soon as possible. Ugh!
  • zanna said:
    Just had a ACDF last week and got Dilaudid drip. I can't take anything with codine. Now I'm on Darvocet, but have dropped it and am just going with Tylenol. Those pills make me just too depressed and now is the time to be positive!
    That's amazing that you are only 1 week post op and off of pain medication. You must be doing very well.
  • Well, maybe morphine is overused, but what if it does not work? I forgot to mention that, they put me on morphine the first day, funny what you forget over time, har, har...

    I forgot all about that, First day was morphine and possible hydrocodone? My pain just laughed at it. Now, see what I did, funny how the forum can help us recall events that we forget! I'm not so worried now, I had forgotten all about the fact they were trying to control the pain, it was just that bad.

    I guess what I still need to do is make sure I get plan A and plan B in place, just in case.

    What I would say pepper09 is that if you ever get placed in this position again, have your husband call your doctor, from the hospital! It is the correct way to make sure someone knows you are having problems that are not getting solved.

    I read someone else on here that had pain management problems in the hospital and that is what they did!
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