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Pain and "addiction" if you will...

13

Comments

  • Actually, your point was the same as mine, we just said it differently (I like to make fun of words that have more than one "meaning")
    >:D<
  • Whyme said:
    Yes! you hit the nail on the head Judy... to get "high" on life is life's greatest gift, why shouldn't everyone be able to have that gift? I miss the smell of fresh mown grass after I mow!
    I was just telling my mom yesterday...I cant believe how much i miss cutting the grass...

    funny how i took that for granted...
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  • On the forum, on the news, in our own house, we hear so much about what a huge difference there is between dependence and addiction. I want to point out that this is the ENGLISH language: a language where a cup can be interchangeable with Glass, and yet glass can also mean the stuff used in windows, and a cup can be part of a bra.

    The dictionary lists:

    de·pen·dence
    Variant(s): also de·pen·dance \di-'pen-d?n(t)s\
    noun
    15th century
    1 : the quality or state of being dependent; especially : the quality or state of being influenced or determined by or subject to another
    2 : reliance, trust
    3 : one that is relied on
    4 a : drug addiction
    b : habituation 2b

    The "definition gods" use the word that is so scorned to define the more favored term. In fact, if you look in a thesaurus, they are interchangeable. I've looked up dependence in several places, and have not found one place (yet) that does not have some form of "state of being psychologically or physiologically dependent on a drug".

    In one place I found "Addiction is a dependence on a behavior or sub-stance that a person is powerless to stop. The term has been partially replaced by the word dependence for substance abuse."

    There is such a stigma placed on the word "addicted" in regards to medication, but it's ok to be addicted to life, to food, to love, to being needed, and on and on.

    I really hate the English language.

    I am going to repeat something I said previously: Hi, my name is Kat, and I'm ADDICTED to feeling human. How bout you?

  • Whyme said:
    Iwant to point out that this is the ENGLISH language: a language where a cup can be interchangeable with Glass, and yet glass can also mean the stuff used in windows, and a cup can be part of a bra.
    But.... definitions of dependence and addiction in this context are not based on the English language or the Websters Dictionary definition. ;) They're based on the terminology and definitions contained in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is published by the American Psychiatric Association and contains the specific diagnostic criteria and diagnosis codes for every recognized mental health disorder.






  • do you happen to have these handy - it would be interesting to see how the medical profession defines these two terms.

    pfm
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  • Hello again :p

    But, it is the English language, and no matter what way we cut it, every single person in the world is NOT going to be thinking about the same thing when they think of "cuddly" or "soft" or "upside" or even yes, "dependency" and "addiction".

    No matter what way we cut it "dependence" means: a reliance on another (person, thing) for love, affection, mothering, comfort, security, food, warmth, shelter, protection. Now add to this a need to be pain free.

    Many in pain will agree, this is not always an option, but a basic need, for without the relief some would be reduced to blathering idiots. (No offence)

    I don't have a medical dictionary, and of course the online versions aren't always correct, but merriam-webster's online medical dictionary and lists:

    \di-ˈpen-dən(t)s\
    Function:
    noun
    1: the quality or state of being dependent upon or unduly subject to the influence of another
    2 a: drug addiction b: habituation

    So again, here is that "ugly: word "addiction".

    Dependency and addictions are not always associated with disorders, just as balls and goals are not always associated with soccer.

    I believe I've reached the end of my discussion ability on this subject. I just wanted to understand why others thought addiction was so different from dependence.

  • don't you hate it when people keep answering their own posts? =))

    i finally found a reason for my confusion on this subject:

    from an amj psychiatry letter to the editor (found here: https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/163/11/2014-a)

    "to the editor: we agree with the call made by charles o’brien, m.d., ph.d., et al. for a clarification of terminology in discussions of opioid use (1). we also agree that the dsm committees’ choice of terminology to date is problematic. the use of the term "dependence" as a euphemism for addiction originated as a well-intentioned attempt to counter negative effects of the social stigmatization of addicted patients. unfortunately, it has resulted in creating significant confusion in discussions of pain management by clouding the important distinction between physical dependence and uncontrolled psychological craving (addiction). examples of this confusion are replete in the literature (2–4)."

    so, i suppose i will leave you all alone on this subject :p sometimes i wonder if i have too much time on my hands.....

    hugs!
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