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Pain alternating between legs

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2

Comments

  • Any movement like a typical ab crunch...meaning you are bending your chest into your knees and entire torso is raises off the floor and the worst would be to add a twisting motion. (God No)

    Now if you want to work your upper abs with no crunch that can be done the way they have it here where basically you just raise the upper torso but your lower torso never leaves the ground. I believe in our cases we should not use swiss balls as it requires to much stability as the floor is the best bet till we are 100%. Later push down exercises involving weights or even bicep curls can engage the core quite a bit!

    -js

    My former life has been helping with this stuff...
  • jsirabella what was your former life? I'm curious, what doctor speciality have you found to be most helpful and knowledgable about your back issues? I really have yet to find a doctor worth his/her salt. Even the guy giving me the shot, a psyiatrist, is telling me my MRI is normal and the little bulge shouldn't be the problem. Yeesh.
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  • I was considered to be quite the avid weight lifter and cyclist. I actually was on a team and was hoping to make a career at it. I did train people on a regular basis and was paid for the services on many occasions. I woke up pretty much 5 days a week at 430am to be out on the road by 5am on cycling days and than off-season in the gym. It was something I took quite seriously so I learned as much as I could not just for cycling. My coach won the nationals in Hungary.

    But now that seems like a very distant memory as I thought I could never get this hurt from a small fall. I mean from 200 miles a week to hard to walk 30 minutes....hmm. Well like I said a former life where I wish to have half the abilities I once had. I believe I am starting to see a light.

    But as far as doctors go that is a real tough one. You see every one of them will go with what they know..meaning ortho goes with PT, spinal ortho goes with some PT/shots and neurosurgeons go straight to surgery. They go with what they know.

    In the end the most important thing is are they treating you like a human being and listening and not just a number. I have found that to be best and for me my 2nd ortho and neurosurgeon seem to best.

    BTW, I would throw in my accupunturist also. In the beginning not much difference but now I can feel much better right after the session.

    Find the docs who you trust and treat you like more than just a case number...and will not let you get a word in edge wise.

    -js
  • I agree finding the right doc is imp. I also experienced that whatever doctor you go to will suggest what their speciality is. The NS leans towards surgery unless you find a real good one. After reading some of the post surgical experiences in this site, I pray to god to keep me away from taht
  • My experience with the little bulge was the same so do not be surprised that most of the docs will search and search before they re-consider it. As it does not match what they were taught. I understand as they want to be thorough also and I honestly feel that there is a 90% chance you will simply recover in time PT or not.

    The docs really hang their hat you may say by that one statistic. The statistic being that 90 - 95% will never need surgery. So they are willing to take their time unless in extreme cases as 90-95% will just heal in good time.

    If you look at most posts, most docs will not touch you with a knife unless you are at the point where you can not get out of bed. They know that if they did the surgery earlier it could probably mean less recovery time but they also know that so few of us will ever reach that point. Ofcourse too in cases where the herniation is so large and obvious they will move much quicker.

    -js
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