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Facet Injection(s) scheduled, would you have the fentanyl with it?

QuiltinouslyQQuiltinously Posts: 152
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:38 AM in Neck Pain: Cervical
Hi all,

It looks like I'll have my first facet injection next week and I've got a few questions.

Did you have the fentanyl offered for "sedation and anxiety"? If I have it, I need to get someone to come with me and drive me home. Do I need it?

Will I receive more than one injection most likely?

Does it work right away if it is going to?

I wonder how will this doctor decide where to inject... he has not even asked for my MRI report or x-rays. I'm having second thoughts and wonder if that is normal. This is a new pain clinic doctor (best clinic in the state) that my GP sent me to just for this. My GP dispenses my meds.

Anything else I should know?

Thanks,
Dee
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1

Comments

  • Take a deep breath! It will all be okay and work out for you. The doc will use what you describe to him to target which facet to inject. He will then use a fluoroscope to guide a needle to the suspect area. It's not a big deal and he should be able to be pretty darn accurate.

    One thing I learned early on, is that if given the option to have fentynal during a procedure like you are going to have, let the doc give it. What happens is a nice "pain reset" for all the associated aches and pains that are being overshadowed at the moment. It helps get back on the other side of the pain and regain control with daily meds.

    Yes, get someone to go with you to drive you home and let the doc make you comfortable for the procedure. This way you don't tie his hands and he can do what he intends to and not be concerned about you needing an escort/ride home.

    "C"
  • Hi Dee :)

    I was told I had to bring someone with me. So that as hag said, so the Dr could make the best choices for me and not worry about me getting home safely.

    Take care & please let us know how things go for you :)

    L1 - S2 "gone" useless in 1 way or another. DDD. RA. Bone Spurs. Tons of nerve damage/issues. Stenosis. Both knees replaced. 50 yrs old. I had a great fall (hence my user name) at age 41 and it has been a domino effect every since.
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  • what type of injections are you getting? ESI or diagnostic for facet oblagation?

    I am all for the meds for the procedures....if they are going to be injecting into my spine, it helps to be a little bit more relaxed. And it if helps the pain afterwards all the better.

    I have not had an ESI injection, but lots of the diagnostics. The length of that can vary depending on how many sites he is injection, and each doctor has their own methods - some longer - some shorter.

    take care and let us know how things go
    patti
  • I had 3 sets of 8 facet joint injections in my lumber area and all he did was freeze the area. I would've preferred some sedation but I did take my own anti-anxiety medication and pain pill before the procedure. Even then I had to have my husband drive me home as it may be too hard to drive yourself. I know sometimes a Doctor can tell by the exam if you're having facet joint problems as when you stand with hands on your hips and have limited movement and pain wile arching backwards it's usually the facet joints as that's what was in my case although it also said on the MRI that I had facet joint arthropy (arthritis). The facet joint injections helped my pain somewhat and I had better movement afterwards. But I also had a epidural(caudal) at the same time. I would want him to look at the report if your Dr. faxed it to him though. Ice helps afterwards if you have some discomfort. I hope the injections help you. Take care. Charry
    DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing c-spine c4-c7 RN
  • I've also had facet injections (4 at the same time) and I didn't feel much of anything. They said that they'd given me sedation, but if they did, I didn't feel it. But I also didn't feel the injections, so maybe they were right.

    The really great thing is that it doesn't take much time at all. Your doc will be the one deciding if you need more than one injection during the procedure.

    As far as it working right away, I'm not sure because I had an ESI at the same time that made the back of my legs extremely sore. That kind of outweighed any benefit I had for the first few hours. However, I did notice that my LBP was better the next day. Mine only lasted six weeks.

    I agree with the others - if you're not having a diagnostic procedure where they want you completely alert for the procedure, take whatever medications they offer and have someone drive you home. Even without medications, I've found that it's good to have someone drive me home anyway because sometimes you'll get an initial pain period that might make it difficult to drive.

    Good luck with the injections and let us know how it goes.
    Cath
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  • I've also had facet injections (4 at the same time) and I didn't feel much of anything. They said that they'd given me sedation, but if they did, I didn't feel it. But I also didn't feel the injections, so maybe they were right.

    The really great thing is that it doesn't take much time at all. Your doc will be the one deciding if you need more than one injection during the procedure.

    As far as it working right away, I'm not sure because I had an ESI at the same time that made the back of my legs extremely sore. That kind of outweighed any benefit I had for the first few hours. However, I did notice that my LBP was better the next day. My relief only lasted six weeks.

    I agree with the others - if you're not having a diagnostic procedure where they want you completely alert for the procedure, take whatever medications they offer and have someone drive you home. Even without medications, I've found that it's good to have someone drive me home anyway because sometimes you'll get an initial pain period that might make it difficult to drive.

    Good luck with the injections and let us know how it goes.
    Cath
  • I have had so many I think I could do them to myself if I could reach back there! Seriously - I have had them with "sedation" -fentanyl/versed, and without, and even have one doc insist on propofol (his call, not mine). If the facet injections are being done for relief (therapeutic reasons), the fentanyl may actually help break up your pain cycle if you are going through a flare. I have had several facet injections without any sedation/twilight per my request and its tolerable. If the facet injecton is doing for diagnostic purposes, its actually best to do without any sedation. Regardless, they are going to make you have a driver in case you wig and they are worried you will move; if you have never had one they usually put an IV in any way just in case. The twilight or fentanyl doesn't but you to sleep, just diminishes the pain and overall relaxes the body. Like I said though, if your in a flare the one-time fentanyl may be a plus.
  • Thanks for the good info and answers to my questions.

    This is a cervical injection and it's not diagnostic. I guess I need to find someone to come with me. Not easy, but I don't want to be in pain either.

    "C" The pain reset sounds pretty good. Thanks for telling me that it will be okay.

    I'll let you all know how it goes.
    Thanks,
    Dee
  • on your tolerance to fentanyl. I've had the cervical injections as a test balloon prior to ablation. Your doctor will give you local anesthesia prior to starting the procedure as there are multiple but unilateral injection sites. (I'm told if you do them bilaterally it causes dizziness, disorientation, nausea, etc.) It will be done under fluoroscopy so he can see exactly where he is, and he is aiming for a location that is the same in everyone and not specific to you except as he can differentiate under the fluoroscope, which is why he hasn't needed the MRI, etc. plus the fact that he will be dependent on your responses to tell him where to shoot.

    I never had fentanyl prior to a facet injection, I've never had Versed prior to a lumbar injection and I've never seen the need. That said, the worst part of the facet injections is lying face down on the table dead still for an extended time. If you're nervous or think you're going to have trouble staying still, by all means take the meds. My recommendation is to take a driver either way. I felt fine, but I was glad not to have to drive. I'd wish you luck, but I promise you don't need it.

    TitanNeck
  • YIKES! I had no idea I'd be laying on my face the whole time. That is a guaranteed migraine for me. Crud!

    I am having trouble finding a driver, so that may decide on the fentanyl right there.

    Thanks again, Titan and all.
    You all are amazing!
    Dee
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