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Morphine pump trial experience today

AnonymousUserAAnonymousUser Posts: 49,578
edited 06/11/2012 - 7:39 AM in Pain Management
Hello everyone, this is my first time posting. This morning I had a morphine pump trial. The way they did the trial i was not to happy with. The doctor gave me 1 injection of morphine interthecally, they then had me lie down for 3 hours. I had some pain releif, how much i don't know due to me laying down the entire time. My question:is there any other ways of doing this morphine trial without one single injection. I could not make the decision of having it fully implanted from one injection. I really do not know how well it worked. When i had my neurostim trial they inserted lead wires in my back and sent me home for 3 days to observe if it works, i was hoping for some kind of trial similar to the neurostim. Any info will be greatly appreciated.
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Comments

  • Welcome aboard. I am sure you will get a whole lot of feed back.

    Hope you don't mind; I locked the other 2 threads you inadvertently made so all your responses would be in one place.

    Good luck; hope you are able to have all your questions answered!
  • Here are the methods of conducting a pain pump trial. One thing to keep in mind, is that many insurance companies have the say as to which method is conducted. I would suggest talking to your doc to see what his specific guidelines are and whether or not your insurance company dictated the method he used.

    "C"


    Single Injection Method Description

    ■ The patient is injected with a single bolus of intrathecal morphine via a lumbar puncture.

    Multiple Injections

    ■ Administer a series of intrathecal or epidural injections.
    ■ For epidural administration, administer injections via an epidural catheter inserted under fluoroscopy to assure proper placement

    Continuous Infusion

    ■ Place an intrathecal or epidural catheter and connect to an external infusion pump.
    ■ Test therapy efficacy over a period of days to weeks.
    ■ Continuous infusion can more closely mimic an implantable system, and response can be assessed during the patient’s daily activities.
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  • haglandc said:
    Here are the methods of conducting a pain pump trial. One thing to keep in mind, is that many insurance companies have the say as to which method is conducted. I would suggest talking to your doc to see what his specific guidelines are and whether or not your insurance company dictated the method he used.
    Can't the insurance company be excluded from the process by paying for the procedure yourself?
  • SageRave said:
    haglandc said:
    Here are the methods of conducting a pain pump trial. One thing to keep in mind, is that many insurance companies have the say as to which method is conducted. I would suggest talking to your doc to see what his specific guidelines are and whether or not your insurance company dictated the method he used.
    Can't the insurance company be excluded from the process by paying for the procedure yourself?
    If you can afford it.
  • Welcome to Spine Health.
    I am sorry your trial did not work out as well as you hoped. "C" is correct in her information.
    I would talk to the Doctor and see if you can have another trial. Hope it works out for you.
    Best of luck.
    Cheers :H
    Patsy W
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  • I also had the single injection version and thankfully I noticed the difference in my leg pains and spasms. It was however hard to tell in my lower back because it was really sore from the procedure itself. I also think that the continuous infusion is the best way to go if you are lucky enough that your insurance pays for that. And if you got enough dough to bypass the insurance co.'s roadblocks, then more power to you. It's really expensive but worth every penny if it helps.
  • I have a question for all who has, or have gone through pain pump trial. Did you have to go off all pain meds for a short period of time before they started trial?  My pain clinic said this is a mandatory process. With all my research, I could not find where this is done. So, I am wondering if this is just something my clinic does?  Thank you for responses. I am currently considering a pump since my psoriatic arthritis has worsen and oral meds are just not working for me anymore.

  • LizLiz Posts: 8,835

    This is a discussion created by a member mo longer on the forum so i am closing it

    Liz, Spine-health Moderator

    Spinal stenosis since 1995
    Lumber decompression surgery S1 L5-L3[1996]
    Cervical stenosis, so far avoided surgery
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