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Getting off of narcotics

AnonymousUserAAnonymousUser Posts: 49,321
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:41 AM in Lower Back Pain
I have had 9 lower back surgeries. I have been on every type of narcotic for many years. The narcotics have simply stopped working, as I have built up a wicked tolerance for them all! Currently I'm prescribed 200 mg. mscontin 3x daily, and 15 mg. oxycodone 4x daily. I have weaned myself down to just 3 30 mg. tablets of mscontin. It wasn't easy, as withdrawal symptoms were certainly felt! My question is this: Has anyone else out there stopped narcotics completely? If so, how long does it take, and how hard is it to get off them completely?
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Comments

  • Really?????????
  • People have. You'll find them in the Pain Medications area of the forum.
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  • good for you to get down to what you're taking. i'm glad you're doing it slowly and hope your doctor is helping you out. this is one person who overcame the need for narcotics. it's been 2 years for me and i need medications still. best wishes. charry https://www.spine-health.com/forum/chronic-pain/back-pain-and-narcotics
    DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing c-spine c4-c7 RN
  • Shinty,
    I would applaud anyone attempting to reduce the medication that they take and we have to be realistic in getting adequate coverage balanced with our desire to reduce our overall intake. Even the PM clinic suggested it would be unrealistic to be taking no medication for our pain and where the notion of a realistic threshold is differs for every individual.

    My suggestion would be to take it very slowly and only reduce one medication at a time it may well say only stop taking them on the authority and guidance of a doctor. I know in my own tainted belief I stopped taking certain medication that in my view was less effective, I lived to regret that unrealistic objective and was soon clambering back to the level previously.

    I now take medication to protect me from medication itself and that is not preferable and anyone seeking to reduce medication should seek our appropriate medical support, the perception may be that the majority are going the other way and increasing volumes in the belief that this in itself will reduced the pain overall, we all have to live with the side effect that in themselves become more invasive as the volume increases, finding that balance of adequate relief and manageable fog is an ongoing trial that may never be suitably achieved.

    Take care and good luck.

    How have you convinced yourself that in reducing your overall medication volume you can survive in what may be viewed as a perceived increasing pain level as a direct consequence. ?

    John
  • Yes it is possible, but it requires one strong support team and one that knows what they are doing. Unless something is done to address the pain generation source, the statistics of those going back onto narcotics is very high.

    I used to be on large daily dose of Oxycontin, oxycodone and percocet. I went through Rapid Opioid Detox in conjunction with surgery to remove the pain generation source.

    I have been narcotic free for a couple years now and plan to stay that way. I wound up with a Spinal Cord Stimulator to help control the pain I deal with now.

    "C"
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  • I went through the same process. It is super difficult. 30 day detox/rehab. There they will monitor you and help reduce the painful W/Ds. It still isnt fun but I tried twice on my own and ended up in the ER both times in a week. Oxy and Oxycodone is rough to come off. Some people on here say they didnt really have any W/Ds, I laugh at them like Whatever. Its serious and uncomfortable. Good luck to you, you will feel a lot better on the other side of those meds. Once off, you will better be able to access your real pain level. There is better meds out there to help if you are still in some pain.

  • haglandc said:
    Yes it is possible, but it requires one strong support team and one that knows what they are doing. Unless something is done to address the pain generation source, the statistics of those going back onto narcotics is very high.

    I used to be on large daily dose of Oxycontin, oxycodone and percocet. I went through Rapid Opioid Detox in conjunction with surgery to remove the pain generation source.

    I have been narcotic free for a couple years now and plan to stay that way. I wound up with a Spinal Cord Stimulator to help control the pain I deal with now.

    "C"
    Hi Sean,

    It is good to know that you are out of narcotics and
    you didnt need to worry about anything, and also it is good that you are dealing it right with spinal cord problem.

    It is important to deal with the pain and once you get this done you dont need to worry about.

    Thanks
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