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Just wanna pain med that works!

2

Comments

  • I hope you witnessed your Dr. tossing out your leftover medication. This is a controversial subject because it is illegal to dispense our medications to *anyone* other than who they are originally Rx'ed for, that includes your own Dr., unless, as I mentioned above, you actually witnessed him dispensing/discarding of them. Ok..lol, I just re-read and see that you did witness the disposal of your medications.

    This makes a lot of patients angry, because you did pay for those medications and by law they are yours. However, if you are changing medications a lot of Drs don't feel comfortable allowing the patient to have both the new and the "old" med, the old which is no longer useful to the patient for fear the patient may (possibly) make bad choices, ie; extra meds can cause overdose, company(home visitors) can steal them, you could use diversion, etc.

    I'm glad your medication is helping your pain most of the day for now, and I do understand it's a long process. I always remind myself on my bad days of how it felt before I had any relief and that helps me to feel more thankful, even on the days when I don't feel as though I'm having much at all.
  • Hi Emmy

    I can share your frustration with finding the right medications. I've been on my latest round of this for about 5 months now with no real luck. And the side effects have caused lots of new problems.

    It is a slow process trying new meds. My doctor insists on starting with very low doses and speaking with me on the phone each week before I increase. We have a great relationship and discuss the pros and cons of each meds and make a decision together. I've never had him ask for meds back and have to say I am pretty shocked by that. I have never had a doctor do this.

    You mentioned that you have been in pain for several years. What have you been doing to manage the pain before this doctor? Are you just looking for better management of the pain or has your situation changed in some way?

    I'm glad to hear that you are finding some relief. But keep in mind that medications need to be constantly monitored and adjusted under the guidance of your doctor. Your body and your life is constantly changing.
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  • Medications are no longer allowed to be flushed down the toilet or put into a sink. EPA ruled against it saying it was polluting waste water. Makes no sense to me since it is diluted anyway. But, drugs can be turned in to specific collection sites. They are regulated by the DEA. I run an ambulance service and we have to send all medications if they expire before we use them to a specific company that correctly disposes of the material.

    I'm not a lawyer or doctor, but I don't think the doctor can make you destroy the drugs in front of them. As has been noted, you paid for them. But, it's also your responsibility that they aren't used for illegal activity or diversion purposes.

    Keith
    Several Epidurals, L4-S1 360 ALIF, Numerous Facet Joint Injections, RFA x2
  • That's right - I forgot about that new ruling against flushing meds down the toilet or drain, but the Dr should not have forgotten. If medications are taken in to the Drs office for disposal they are supposed to be put into the sharps container, witnessed, and signed by two witnesses(the patient being one), usually a nurse is the other witness.

    No, the Dr can't MAKE you bring your medications in to be destroyed, but he can refuse your new Rx without them, and he can DC you for non-compliance of his office policy(s).

    I have never had this happen either. Now that I think about it I don't think I have ever changed medications (opiates or controlled substances) midway through, it has always been at appt. times whenever my Dr has made changes and even then it hasn't happened very often.
  • Emmy,
    I have researched academic PM for twenty years and never seen any evidence that medication alone is the panacea for the pain we endure, accumulative simultaneous strategies, are suggested as the best possible notion for managing pain and the desire to find one medication even at increased volume will not manage our pain sufficiently, we all diminish in function as the volume of medication increases and we have to find our own balance between function and pain relief.

    One would expect any change of medication to be introduced slowly and give sufficient time for any benefit or detriment to be evaluated, finding what works for us as individuals is a very personal, just as treatments or even surgery. Eventually perhaps we all come to some compromise with what works for us and as we change our strategy need to mirror those needs, I have yet to find an adequate overall plan that caters to my needs, the moment I seem to get closer the more advanced that carrot evades me.

    Pain is emotional, imparts frustration anxiety and disorientation, skills and techniques of coping take time to develop, those more able are not in less pain, rather they micro-manage the whole process more effectively. It is not easy waiting in pain for those expectant improvements that sometime do not materialise, did we expect too much, managing pain itself can be an illusive objective, that seemed simple when we set off.

    If we are doing all that is asked of us, we can do no more, for many here recreating who we were is a distant memory, as the new unfamiliar us emerges.

    Take care, we are here to help each other.

    John.
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  • I applaud you, and hope that someday I can reach that "balance" you obviously already have...very inspiring..
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