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Permanent SCS

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2

Comments

  • Well I'm two weeks post-op and have learned that I run about 80% of the battery in the IPG after about 10 days. After running it down this low a couple times I'm going to do a weekly recharge, won't have any issues with over-discharge.

    I have discovered only one down-side to the SCS... Since it covers my back and legs, I cannot put my cell phone on vibrate because I don't feel it! Otherwise I have absolutely no complaints! Well aside from the residual pain from the laminectomy. Not taking the additional meds though, I'm back on my normal meds. I'm weaning myself off of several of my meds, neurontin first and then I'm going to switch to ms-contin and wean from the long-term meds. My goal is to get to where I have breakthrough pain meds only, I think that goal is attainable because of how well it is working for me. (Fingers crossed!)

    Today is my first day back to work and I'm holding up okay. I still have pain from the incision on my back when I lean back in my chair, which is unfortunate but hopefully won't be long until that resolves. I really can't wait for me to completely heal from the surgery so I can have a real comparison to what I was feeling before the implant.

    Cheers my buzzing brothers & sisters,
    Jay
  • That's excellent news. It is funny the things we find that our stimulators interfere with, that we had no idea about before. Since my SCS is stimulating my shoulders, arms and hands, I found that I cannot take anyone's pulse or any critter's pulse. I cannot distinguish the pulse through the stimulation. Can you put your cell phone in your front pocket? Would you be able to feel it there?

    Good luck back at work. Please be careful, but enjoy the sense of freedom once again. Heal up quickly.

    "C"
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  • Your story should inspire others who are "on the fence" about the stimulator.

    Being able to return to work so soon is huge! That is just great that it is helping you so much. Isn't pain relief the most womderful feeling in the world?

    Good luck with the meds and continued success with your stimulator.

    Patsy W
  • Jay-
    Congrats on your success. I too "buzz" up and down my backside and find the pain relief irreplacable.

    Just a personal note on the cell phone business - I have a DroidX and I was keeping it in my back pocket - right up against my battery and I fried the darn thing. It was still under warranty and after the Verizon guy said, "Mam, I don't know anything about a "stimulator," he replaced the phone for free. I am now advised that unless my cell phone is in a Faraday Cage, I shouldn't put it near my EMF generating battery.

    Good luck to you, sir-
    Mack
  • I am very new to here and am less than 24hrs into my trial scs. Why have it in your abdomen vs bum like suggested?
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  • moodlymoo,
    Sorry it's been a long time replying, I didn't see there was another post here!

    My decision to have it in my abdomen was based on activities that I engage in and ease of changing programs. I don't have anything that would interfere with the IPG if it's in my abdomen, but possibly would if it was in my back. One thing I decided during my trial was that it was a pain in the butt (so to speak) to make program changes with the external IPG in the back and much easier when it was up front. (Since it hooked on my belt I could change where it sat.) One thing I can say is that there was one extra incision during the permanent implant: they had to make a 3/4" cut on my side to route the leads properly from my back to the IPG in my abdomen. I actually didn't even realize that I had that incision until they told me because it didn't even bother me!

    Hope your trial went well and you're able to move on to a permanent if that is the way you want to go.
    Jay
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