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decompression therapy

2

Comments

  • sandisandi Posts: 6,269
    edited 09/04/2014 - 5:20 AM
    All I can say is that, adjustments and decompression are two different procedures, however, they both can go wrong.
    I am overly cautious when it comes to allowing a chiropractor or other treatments that aren't proven near my spine after my fiasco.
    I would be asking many questions, the safety of the decompression, how it is supposed to work, how long before you are expected to see any results, if it is covered by insurance, and what amount of pressure/distraction they will be using for how long.
    I swore by chiropractors for the 15 years before my first surgery, but because of one adjustment , I wound up having two surgeries, and spent some time in a wheelchair.....and now have to face a third. If the chiro involved had listened to the first chiro and not done that adjustment, I wouldn't be in this position.
  • LC84LLC84 Posts: 599
    edited 09/04/2014 - 12:47 PM
    I spoke with my Dr and I have decided not to go forward with the decompression therapy. I have too many issues and the risk is just too high. My Dr's understand that I want to exhaust all options before having the Fusion, but they don't think it will help in my case, so why take the risk? I know the difficulty you've gone through, and it's a scary thing to think about. I also know that there are other options out there. Sometimes we get to a point of desperation and are willing to do whatever it takes to get some relief. Through research it made it sound too good to be true, and in many cases it is.

    I really appreciate your response. Thanks again!
    LC
    Progressive DDD
    Osteoarthritis
    Chronic S1 Radiculopathy
    Discectomy L5-S1 2002
    Discectomy, Laminotomy/Foraminotomy L3-S1 January 2014
    Bilateral SI Joint Fusion and 2 level spinal Fusion October 2014
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  • I'm glad that you made a decision you are happy with.......and I am in total agreement with you, when things promised sound too good to be true, they generally are.
    I am skeptical when I read about promised "cures' but they aren't covered by insurance or aren't mainstream treatments......I mean, if they are sure fire cures for what ails us, why aren't all of the doctors offering them? Or insurance paying for it? If it is a cure, then it would seem that insurance companies would be first on the bandwagon sending all of us for these "treatments"......
  • I couldn't agree more.

    Again, thank you for your response.

    LC
    Progressive DDD
    Osteoarthritis
    Chronic S1 Radiculopathy
    Discectomy L5-S1 2002
    Discectomy, Laminotomy/Foraminotomy L3-S1 January 2014
    Bilateral SI Joint Fusion and 2 level spinal Fusion October 2014
  • I had a Physical Therapist at a world renowned spinal clinic attached to a Top 5 medical school working on some chronic thoracic pain. They already knew I had herniated discs in my lumbar spine and had undergone radiation therapy in the cervical area treating lymphoma a few years earlier. The therapist just could not get anything moving in my thoracic spine (I'm a very big athletic guy and she was a smallish woman) and finally one day got out some sort of firm foam wedge. She placed me on it and pushed hard. "POP!" It was a very deep "POP!" and I knew immediately that either this was wonderfully good or horrifically bad. The next morning I had my answer. It felt like my left arm had been set on fire. I've had third degree burns and that's exactly what this pain felt like from my elbow to my fingertips. The pain was so intense I couldn't get into an MRI for nearly two months. After six months they were preparing to do a disc fusion at C7-T1 and upon check-in at the hospital I only escaped quadriplegia because I'd researched the night before "disc fusion and radiation therapy" learning the two are utterly incompatible. Several months later, they proposed an experiment using a pediatric tool for nucleoplasty on my cervical disc. Midway through the procedure I felt the sensation of a bucket of cold water being poured over my left arm. Today, almost a decade later, I still have pain in my left arm and hand along with pretty severe atrophy although with meds I can work and have a normal life. And of course I still have all the original chronic thoracic pain to go with my new pain from cervical herniations.

    So my point simply is this: before you allow someone to manipulate your spine, think VERY carefully about whether it is worth the risks. I was treated by a top notch Physical Therapist under supervision of a world class Osteopathic Orthopedic Surgeon in a world class spinal clinic. The result, to phrase it mildly, was sub-optimal.
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