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New Vicodin law

Artificial disc at L5S1 for 10 years. Had 3 Level lumbar fusion and Laminectomy on Sept 27, 2013. It was an OLIF (Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion) with cages, BMP, rods & screws. Norco, Plaquenil
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Comments

  • and although it is not great, it is not different than for other narcotic/opiate based medications requiring patients see their prescribers on a regular basis for renewal. Most of us have to do that now. The only real difference is that those who take vicoden will now have to do the same as the majority of the rest of us have had to do for the last several years.
  • At least with pain management patients, I don't think it's going to make any difference...I wouldn't think too many c;inics let you go more than 3 months without being physically seen anyway

    my wife, who is prescribed hydrocodone, is lucky enough to be seen every 3 months at her pain management office...instead of the doctor writing out one Rx with 2 refills, he'll just write 3 separate Rx with them being post dated (which is what has been already happening the last few visits)...bing bam boom done
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  • and I see my doctor every third month. The other two months, I pick up my prescriptions a day or two before they are due to be needed again.
    I don't see this change for hydrocodone products being that big of a deal, since it is the most widely abused medication at this stage, and contains an opiate so changing it's classification just puts it on thesame schedule as the other opiates.
  • The only people affected by this will be the people that need it, does anyone really think the drug addicts will not get them still??? This is the government looking for things to do to justify the big government we have.
  • I thought this was the way things are done already. At least it is with my PM Dr. Prior to being switched to Percocet, I was prescribed Norco. My PM Dr has always scheduled appointments with me every 4 weeks. The only medication that he's ever put refills on is Flexeril. I thought all narcotics required a hard copy of the script & could not be called in. The positive side of this is that seeing my Dr every 4 weeks has allowed me to build a close relationship with him & he can keep a close eye on how I am doing. There have been times, when I went to an appointment & was having a flare up, so he was able to give me a Toradol injection, suggest another ESI, or adjust my medication (this was all pre surgery, which was 8/28). With that being said, the negative side of this is having to pay a co-pay (old insurance was $55; new insurance is $45) every 4 weeks. With the economy or people not having insurance, this can be a huge burden & prevent some from having access to appropriate care. Either way, the new law doesn't affect things for me bc that is how my Dr was doing things anyhow, but I am very sorry for those that are affected negatively. A person requiring pain management has enough problems trying to get appropriate care, they don't need any more hurdles. In Florida, it is sometimes so difficult to get a prescription for pain medications filled. IMO, it's organized nonsense that only creates a larger black market. The intention to curb diversion is a good one, but it's the people who are truly in need of these medications that end up getting hurt. I've said it before and I'll say it again: if any of these nasty, judgmental pharmacists/techs or DEA lawmakers had to deal with the kind of pain we deal with, or had to watch a loved one deal with it, they would want better for themselves or loved ones.
    8/28/14 Discectomy, Laminectomy, Foraminotomy L5-S1
    9/15/15 Surgical Debridement of infected surgical incision & drain seroma; wound vac applied
    10/21/14 L5-S1 Osteomyelitis & Discitis; 10/23/14 Bone & Tissue Biopsy = MRSE
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  • on the same schedule of narcotics as the majority of the rest of the opiates used in pain management. Instead of physicians being able to give refills, it simply means that patients must be seen by their physician and refills can not be faxed or written on the hard copy of the prescriptions as they used to be. .
    I think it should have been that way all along, putting the same class of medications with the same guidelines for dispensing as the majority of us have had to deal with.
    It is not going to change the doctors being able to prescribe the medication, for patients who need it, it will however make those patients taking it have to see their doctors on a regular basis, just as the rest of us have to do.
  • I've built a great relationship with my doc & collect paper prescriptions without having to pay for a visit unless I need to discuss things & make changes so this really doesn't effect me. I've never really understood why Hydrocodone was treated differently to other narcotic meds. Having said that, the docs I've spoken too don't like not having a strong pain med that they can phone in for a patient. This doesn't really effect most of us because our problems are ongoing.

    A few months ago a friend was prescribed a new narcotic med that she couldn't tolerate. Her doc told her to immediately stop taking it & phoned in a hydro prescription to her pharmacy. Her husband had taken time off from work to drive her to the appointment as he does every month. If this happened now he would need more time off to go back & collect the hydro prescription. He uses all of his vacation to take his wife to medical appointments!
    I completely understand the politics & pressures going on at the moment but for some just getting to appointments is so incredibly hard. I bet for some loosing the repeat prescription option is going to be a financial & logistical nightmare. I think most of us already had to deal with monthly drives, copays & paper prescriptions anyway though.

    About 25 years ago I woke with a trapped nerve in my neck & couldn't breath without excruciating agony. This was back when docs first stopped doing house calls (in UK) & people believed that change would be impossible to live with! My uk doctor sent pain meds by taxi-cab to my house...and then sent stronger ones 5 hours later! Can you imagine that happening now?!? The days of a little community doctor who remembers our first nappy-rash & sniffles is long gone.

    Narcotics are such a hot topic. I don't think this is the last law change we're going to see & we're powerless to stop the tide. I've said before, the war on drugs has been an epic failure. Prescription narcotics is an area they can control to some extent & we're collateral damage. I was a big supporter of the first changes, prescription monitoring, closing pill mills but it's all going too far. For most of us this is a small one. I hate to think what could be coming....
    Osteoarthritis & DDD.
  • frequently abused medications and has been for decades........before all of these changes in the laws regarding pain medications were in place, vicoden prescriptions were almost automatically given with a 5 month refill ....so your first prescription was filled, then you could fill on demand for the remaining 5 refills......this I think is where we started seeing the abuse of medications start to slide up in drastic numbers. Then when the six months were gone, a simple phone call to your primary was enough to get you another fill or better yet, you could call the pharmacy and they would call the doctor to get the new prescription and you could do that over and over again.
    I remember having a family doctor as a child, the same one who was there from the time of my birth, to adolescence, and then when you became an adult, your children saw them.......housecalls were a staple of the family physician, along with the black bag, and he usually came with the medications for the normal, ear infections, coughs, anti biotics or called the pharmacist in to fill the meds for you if you needed them that night...
  • Ahhh the black bag! Be careful Sandi we're starting to sound old!!!

    I remember having a similar conversation about Hydrocodone. Coming from England I was amazed how easily it was prescribed. I'd never heard of narcotics being prescribed for dental work etc. I raised the subject in "Moms Club" & every woman there had taken hydro although most had never suffered a serious illness. It's not like that in other countries. As a newcomer to this country I was amazed by how easily those narcotics were prescribed. Codeine was the standard for chronic pain in the UK.
    I feel like its going from one extreme to another. I now frequently hear of chronic spine pain patients being given less narcotic meds than I was given for a tooth problem! I hope we find the middle ground soon.
    Osteoarthritis & DDD.
  • L333777 said:
    I thought this was the way things are done already. At least it is with my PM Dr. Prior to being switched to Percocet, I was prescribed Norco. My PM Dr has always scheduled appointments with me every 4 weeks. The only medication that he's ever put refills on is Flexeril. I thought all narcotics required a hard copy of the script & could not be called in. The positive side of this is that seeing my Dr every 4 weeks has allowed me to build a close relationship with him & he can keep a close eye on how I am doing. There have been times, when I went to an appointment & was having a flare up, so he was able to give me a Toradol injection, suggest another ESI, or adjust my medication (this was all pre surgery, which was 8/28). With that being said, the negative side of this is having to pay a co-pay (old insurance was $55; new insurance is $45) every 4 weeks. With the economy or people not having insurance, this can be a huge burden & prevent some from having access to appropriate care. Either way, the new law doesn't affect things for me bc that is how my Dr was doing things anyhow, but I am very sorry for those that are affected negatively. A person requiring pain management has enough problems trying to get appropriate care, they don't need any more hurdles. In Florida, it is sometimes so difficult to get a prescription for pain medications filled. IMO, it's organized nonsense that only creates a larger black market. The intention to curb diversion is a good one, but it's the people who are truly in need of these medications that end up getting hurt. I've said it before and I'll say it again: if any of these nasty, judgmental pharmacists/techs or DEA lawmakers had to deal with the kind of pain we deal with, or had to watch a loved one deal with it, they would want better for themselves or loved ones.
    I just got my new Rx for norco last week and CVS pharmacy pharmacist was so mean to me and he told me that they ran out and that was on back order and he didn't know when they going to get it. I change pharmacy, I filled in rite aid and the pharmacist waqs very nice.
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