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Interesting compliment ( sort of ) from my doctor

On my most recent visit to my doctor I had presented her with a paper chronicalling the 3 years of progressing symptoms , broken down into 6 month periods, what is new , what is better, questions in red , and other typical OCD things I had written about 7-8 months ago. Many of my questions were things that she actually tested for on my first visit with her in DEC. and the punch biopsy came back positive for small fiber neurapathy. I apologized because the questions were a bit scattered due to not being diagnosed at the time I wrote it and I said I am OCD ( obsessive compulsive ) and she said no one is more OCD than a neuromusular specialist. She went on to say some doctors dont like to get questions about things in this way, but she enjoys them and always learns things about her patients this way. She commented that she could tell an engineering mind ( i am an engineer ) wrote this due to the breakdown in a problem solving way and then said their is a huge push to bring more electrical and mechanical engineers ( not just biomedical ) like myself into neurology and medicine as a whole due to the way engineers think about things ( differerent than doctors at times), can think outside the box and are always problem solvers. I had heard this before when in chicago seeing a thoracic specialist years ago, he had his own mechanical engineer that ran simulations to predict where damage to spine was after injuries to test MRI machines and used them for surgical placements stuff. Now I am not the simulation kind of engineer , i worked labor before I became an engineer , but I do think its a welcome thing in medicine to bring more of the different disciplines in to help.
Do your due dilegence, trust you know your body and question everything if it does not fit. Advocate for yourself and you will be suprised what will be revealed trusting your body and instinct.
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Comments

  • Actually, it is not unheard of, two of my husband's colleagues (with PhD in Engineering) went back to medical school and they are now practicing MDs. One of my doctors, a Pulmonologist also had a mechanical engineering degree before he got his MD.
  • Bioengineering is actually becoming a more common undergrad for medical school. My undergrad was straight Biology with a concentration in Physiology, but quite a few of my classmates were bioengineer grads. Honestly, anyone that goes through a medical program has to have some sort of OCD...lol. If you can channel it into school, it gives you a huge step ahead!


    Retrolisthesis C4 of C5 and C5 of C6
    Spondylolthesis C5/C6
    Disc protrusions with Annular Tears C3/C4, C4/C5, and C5/C6
    Disc Material Compressing Spinal Cord C3/C4
    Severe Forminal Stenosis C5/C6
    DDD
    Ankylosing Spondylitis 
    Annular Tears L3/L4 and L5/S1
    Enlarged Facet Joints/Facet Anthrosis L3/L4/L5
    PLIF with Rods, Cage, and Pedicle Screws-L4/L5
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  • SavageSavage United StatesPosts: 7,385
    Seems like you and you doctor get along great....understanding each other.
    And yeah that's a compliment.....very much so! Being understood and complimented ...I would think would give emotional relief in that you're in good hands . And she respects you.

    Thanks for sharing that uplifting event!
    Sue
    Honorary Spine-Health Moderator
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Please read my medical history at: Medical History

  • itsautonomicitsautonomic LouisianaPosts: 2,561
    Savage, I was diagnosed with something that for the most part is not curable and there are very few treatments out there for the pain , but she has single handedly she has given me hope and shown compassion I have not felt from the medical community during this diagnosis phase by most of the doctors i have seen. Most importantly she formed a plan and found new issues instead of reserving me to suffer the rest of my life. It has restored some of my faith in the medical community, I only wish I could have seen her early on because she would have diagnosed all my issues from the start and never would have said the issues were in my head leading to alot of depression, she actually has recommended I see a physcologist to talk about my journey the last three years because she saw that this journey to find out what was wrong with my body has taken a huge toll on my life and its left me scarred mentally, actually she sees it alot in patients that had a tramatic event first and then struggled to find diagnosis and heard things like nothing is wrong or its in your head so I am waiting to start that soon. But its so different that a doctor saying "its in your head go see a phyc", she says we found the issue now you have to deal with that issue and the effects left from the search to find what was wrong. The only downside is she has a minimum 6 month wait but price for talent. She is always about 1 hr late to my appt , but first thing she says is apologized because I spend as much time as needed with each patient before I move to the next patient, for someone like me that was music to my ears and I said be as late as you need to be doesnt bother me a bit, i actually appriciate that. I digress, but she is the doctor you envision before you enter the world of doctors and get jaded somewhat.
    Also when I said engineers in medicine she actually meant non-MD, just engineers who work along side doctors running simulations, doing experiements, and many other things to help the doctor by applying engineering concepts to areas of medicine, as much as possible. That was the different thing I had never heard of them in this capacity working with doctors so I thought it was cool that doctors are recognizing a need such as this.
    Do your due dilegence, trust you know your body and question everything if it does not fit. Advocate for yourself and you will be suprised what will be revealed trusting your body and instinct.
  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 13,430
    the hardest thing to every read in a thread is that Its not curable

    Everything is curable to a degree. Spinal problems and associate muscular skeleton problems are indeed curable.
    One known disease does not have a remedy, and that is osteoarthritis. But who knows someday, there will be a remedy and even a cure.
    But if you research a list of problems/diseases/alignments that are not curable., you are not going to find much dealing with the spine. I know this is a spine site, so the focus of attention is on the spine.

    However, when I see some words that need to be addressed as a whole for all of medicine, I need to step in
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences 
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  • I just wanted to put something out there. I have read a lot of posts that talk about the medical system and doctors, and how the are flawed. The thing is, people don't understand what doctors see and have to deal with on a daily basis. I know its frustrating when you are going from doctor to doctor, and they tell you nothing is wrong. Well they are looking at specific tests that are (most of the time) confirmatory tests. That means if there are no abnormalities that show on the MRI, blood work, CT scan, etc its hard to find a definite diagnosis. Therefore, it is hard for them to understand symptoms such as pain, which is subjective They have a license on the line. If they prescribed pain killers, or more extensive testing, when confirmatory tests have shown nothing, they are putting their own future at risk. Plus I'm sorry to say, not all patients are exactly the most honest. I'm just saying, please try and look at what they are up against as well. Doctors are only human...just like the rest of us.


    Retrolisthesis C4 of C5 and C5 of C6
    Spondylolthesis C5/C6
    Disc protrusions with Annular Tears C3/C4, C4/C5, and C5/C6
    Disc Material Compressing Spinal Cord C3/C4
    Severe Forminal Stenosis C5/C6
    DDD
    Ankylosing Spondylitis 
    Annular Tears L3/L4 and L5/S1
    Enlarged Facet Joints/Facet Anthrosis L3/L4/L5
    PLIF with Rods, Cage, and Pedicle Screws-L4/L5
  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 13,430
    well put
    and some very accurate.
    Thank you
    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences 
  • itsautonomicitsautonomic LouisianaPosts: 2,561
    edited 02/13/2015 - 2:55 PM
    Jillybean, i totally agree but by that token doctors are subject to be wrong and often here for sure there are many that refuse to acknowledge that . Doctors to me are like every other occupation great, good, bad and all in between. I work with PHD engineers ( I am engineer) who have no common sense and I work with just bachlors trained ones who are geniuses, the same applys to almost every occupation. Second, I have no problem with a doctor saying they cant find the issue, my problem is when because they exhausted their training and found nothing the issue must be in patients head or because scan showed clear nothing is wrong with them, I think a doctor saying I cant find the issue but i believe their is an issue and i need to refer you to someone who can find problem is a great thing. I think if you are a doctor willing to not refer when patient asks or something gone on long time, and you are sure enough to say its in the patients head their should be liscense problems for you if that patient get a proper diagnosis that reveals it wasnt in head.
    And their are dishonest doctors as well as patients in this world sadly, everyday both are in news any given day. I think doctors and patients should be called what they are, if you are cheating the system to get drugs you are patient who acted irresponsibly, if you tell someone their pain is in their head and it turns out not to be you are a doctor who acted irresponsibly. And so on and so on, all i ever see here is its the patient in the wrong.
    I get that you are pre-med and, but have you ever really read about undertreatment or been on other sites and spoken with people who were misdiagnosed that lead to terrible things in their life ? There are also tons of info out there by doctors regarding under treatment, patients under diagnosed etc
    I do not despise doctors ( I actually think I have two of the best doctors in the world), and I understand they have a very hard job to do, but to me that does not excuse them of critisim when they fail a patient. I always give all the praise in world when someone talks about a doctor that did a bunch for them it's not as if I am only one sided, but I recognize two sides. You can see it here if someone criticizes doctor they are met with negative response about why doctor not wrong or bash doctor but if they talk about how hard doctors have it or what go thru the same people commend that post, I see that as a double standard.
    I also do not understand why prescribing more intensive testing would cause a doctor to lose license ? I could buy that if you dont go to another doctor and they order all that " intensive testing " all at once with no issues and then find the problem. Discogram , yes that is something that can actually hurt the disc so if that is what you mean I fully understand its last line. Just trying to understand what you mean.
    Do your due dilegence, trust you know your body and question everything if it does not fit. Advocate for yourself and you will be suprised what will be revealed trusting your body and instinct.
  • itsautonomicitsautonomic LouisianaPosts: 2,561
    Dilauro, I really am not on same page with you about what I am talking about. I can assure you I am correct here and maybe its not spine related per say , but it is believe to be caused by a spinal injury and can be mistaken for fibro both of which are forums here. Everything is not curable to a degree I am sorry. Small fiber neurapathy has no known cure, it does not have a good study on medicine that actually works for it and unfortunatly the medicine that does counteracts the autonomic issues that it often causes. As i have stated before unless they have an underlying cause to treat, their is no cure. Matter of fact the ( large teaching hospital in minnisota ) clinic sends its patients with it to a 3 week in house intensive pain management course because one of the reasons.... to learn to live with something that there is no cure for. I am not ready to do that so I declined and is why I see my new doctor who works with them but beleives their may be underlying things we can treat. I can promise you true small fiber neurapathy that is ideopathic has just about as much a chance for curing as osteoarthritis. But maybe you know more than two of the top teaching hospitals in the US or several large hospitals in Houston. I would love to discuss this more
    Do your due dilegence, trust you know your body and question everything if it does not fit. Advocate for yourself and you will be suprised what will be revealed trusting your body and instinct.
  • I'm going to be honest with you...it is few and far between when some unexplained diagnosis is made that scans and normal testing do not pick it up. I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but it is a rare occasion. Yes I do believe doctors should refer CERTAIN patients for more extensive testing, but certainly not all. Testing is expensive...a MRI costs thousands of dollars. So, I'm not saying a doctor will per say "loose their license" for ordering more extensive testing, but they work for hospitals that a lot of times have to eat the costs of theses tests and procedures. I just think patients also have to take responsibility. I don't particularly like the term "its in your head." I feel its poor bed side manner, but they are trying to tell SOME patients that pain and symptoms can mask from emotional problems as well...


    Retrolisthesis C4 of C5 and C5 of C6
    Spondylolthesis C5/C6
    Disc protrusions with Annular Tears C3/C4, C4/C5, and C5/C6
    Disc Material Compressing Spinal Cord C3/C4
    Severe Forminal Stenosis C5/C6
    DDD
    Ankylosing Spondylitis 
    Annular Tears L3/L4 and L5/S1
    Enlarged Facet Joints/Facet Anthrosis L3/L4/L5
    PLIF with Rods, Cage, and Pedicle Screws-L4/L5
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