Welcome, Friend!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

advertisement

Quick Start Forum Video Tutorial

    Forum-Tutorial-Screenshot
Protect anonymity
We strongly suggest that members do not include their email addresses. Once that is published , your email address is available to anyone on the internet , including hackers.

Notice
All discussions and comments that contain an external URL will be automatically moved to the spam queue. No external URL pointing to a medical web site is permitted. Forum rules also indicate that you need prior moderator approval. If you are going to post an external URL, contact one of the moderators to get their approval.
There are no medical professionals on this forum side of the site. Therefore, no one is capable or permitted to provide any type of medical advice.
This includes any analysis, interpretation, or advice based on any diagnostic test

The main site has all the formal medical articles and videos for you to research on.
advertisement

Re-herniation after Microdiscectomy and severe lower back pain

Hi every one,

I am 10 weeks post microdiscectomy. On 14th day of surgery I had a mishap due to which I reherniated my disc. Now my MRI confirms re herniation and also shows a small annular tear. In addition I am having severe back pain. I cannot sit for more that 10 minutes. Has anybody else being in the same boat? I am extremely concerned about my situation because I am still off from work and doesnt seem like I would be able to go back to work anytime soon.

What what you guys recommend to do at this point? I did started physio at 5 weeks marks who asked me to do some extension and some flexion exercises.

any help would be greatly appreciated.

thanks

advertisement

Comments

  • MarWinMarWin OhioPosts: 661

    Me personally, I'd be leery of flexion type exercises for fear they'd impinge the area most affected and cause more damage/pain. The main issue I see with discectomy is that they remove tissue to relieve the pain, but do nothing to deal with why the tissue was bulging or torn in the first place. 

    If you cannot sit for more than 10 minutes, then don't do it. Simply find another position. Just be careful of staying static for too long in any position. 

  • can you describe the mishap, just as a piece of information to keep other members informed on what to avoid?

    I'm with Marwin about flexion and extension movements. 

  • advertisement
  • Thanks for the comments guys. The mishap was actually i took a train ride to the downtown of my city. The train was extremely bumpy ride and shook my back pretty bad. After that 60 percent of my symptoms came back and i knew that i reherniated my disc. MRI later confirmed it.

  • Definitely no forward bending.  I ruptured my L3/L4 disc two years ago.  Got the opinion of 3 surgeons.  My procedure was Laminotomy and discectomy.  Though I'm totally fine now and walk 5 miles a day with NO pain at all, still at times I get slight sciatica a day later and still kind of panic thinking did I reherniate the disc.  So getting to the point, what's helped me is doing exercises specifically for a herniated disc as seen on utube from physical therapist or yoga instructors.  Just be sure the videos pertain To and Only herniated disc.

    I find back bends standing or back bends face down on the floor pushing up with arms excellent.  Just do the research, do the exercises in the morning and night - you'll KNOW what works for you. Check out yoga for herniated disc - it helps me everyday.  Good luck - I know what you're dealing with.  I was basically disabled couldn't walk 2 feet without blistering pain down my leg for months. Take care.

  • That is unfortunate that a bumpy train ride could compromise your situation that badly. Just goes to show that we are all different and our conditions are not so cut and dry. 

    I dedicate myself each morning to the stretches and strength building exercises that I learned from my surgeon, PT and my own research. I wake up at 5 when no one else is up, and make sure my day begins in a positive way which I know will feed my recovery.

    Isometric exercising has been incredibly helpful and it does not put much in the way of strain on the body. Walking, as you know, is also so important because it forces to your back into a natural alignment, potential reduces scar tissue build, and feeds blood in places that require tissue repair.

    You likely need PT, but I think it is worth the time to find a really good one, because they are not all created equal. Mine took things slowly...very slowly, but I do believe, in hindsight, that this was the right way to approach healing. I did not, however, heed to every ridiculous precaution, as I am not a feeble being and I know how to protect my spine, and my core is rather sturdy.


  • advertisement
  • i Just hope that with time my situation gets better. Right now the biggest hurdle is sitting. I am extremely worried that if I am not able to sit, i wont be able to go back to work. 

    I did find a new physiotherapist who completely changed all the exercises I was doing. Hopefully in the next few weeks with the stretches there would be some improvement.

advertisement
Sign In or Register to comment.