Welcome, Friend!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

advertisement

Quick Start Forum Video Tutorial

    Forum-Tutorial-Screenshot
Protect anonymity
We strongly suggest that members do not include their email addresses. Once that is published , your email address is available to anyone on the internet , including hackers.

Notice
All discussions and comments that contain an external URL will be automatically moved to the spam queue. No external URL pointing to a medical web site is permitted. Forum rules also indicate that you need prior moderator approval. If you are going to post an external URL, contact one of the moderators to get their approval.
There are no medical professionals on this forum side of the site. Therefore, no one is capable or permitted to provide any type of medical advice.
This includes any analysis, interpretation, or advice based on any diagnostic test

The main site has all the formal medical articles and videos for you to research on.
advertisement
Data Entry Job – SCAM!

We are aware that someone out there is using our CEO’s name and our company name to “recruit” people for a data entry job. It is a fake. Please do not give them any of your personal information. We are not now, nor have we ever, had data entry positions available.

TLIF surgery

advertisement
2

Comments

  • Kimmy72KKimmy72 Posts: 2,107
    edited 06/23/2016 - 6:58 AM
    It's still a mystery as to why no one bothers telling you why you're in so much pain, but just knowing that other people have gone through the same experience is massively helpful to me. I was at one point seriously beginning to wonder if the whole thing had been some kind of drug-induced nightmare. The pain I'm feeling now, two weeks after the op, is pretty bad, but I know now that's not unusual, and again that makes it lot easier to put up with. So, thanks again for your stories and your encouragement, and I wish you all the best for your recoveries.   

    I think everyone experiences pain in their own way, and some individuals are fortunate in that their post-surgical pain isn't off the charts.  Even so, I think doctors want patients to be as calm as possible before their surgeries, and telling someone they might be in horrendous pain when they wake up probably isn't the best way to create a peaceful patient!!!! 

    I appreciate your well-wishes!!  I can very much understand where you're coming from when you realize that you're not alone.  Though I'm sure you wouldn't have wished your experience on anyone, it is comforting to know that there are other people who have experienced the same thing.  In this case, it's comfort in numbers rather than safety!

    You may or may not come to a point where your mind and your body are at odds with what you're physically capable of--basically, it's a theory vs. reality argument.  Your mind says, "Feeling pretty good today...maybe I'll do this, that, or this."  Your brain is theorizing (rationalizing) that since you're not feeling much pain, it's ok to test the waters physically.  In reality, however--and you usually won't realize this until after you've overdone it--your body is on its own time schedule, and is not ready for certain activities.  I'm fairly certain other members will attest to the fact that the "good days" can also be called "danger days"!!  I'm guilty of it myself, and paid my dues dearly for thinking I was physically able to do things that I really wasn't.  Always best to check in with the doctor before you undertake any activity that has even the most remote chance of setting you back recovery-wise.

    Just take 'er easy, listen to your body, and heal well!           

           
    Kimmy72, Spine-health Moderator
    Firm believer in PMA!
  • kevinmbrookskkevinmbrooks north yorkshirePosts: 6
    I understand your point about doctors not wanting to alarm patients - it's a bit like when they tell you that 'this is going to sting a bit' before sticking a six-inch needle into your spine - but personally I would have preferred to have been told that it was possible I might experience a lot of pain on waking from the anaesthetic. It wouldn't have made it any less painful of course, but at least I wouldn't have been quite so shocked and traumatised and at a complete loss as to what the hell was going on.

    I'll do my best to take 'er easy, thanks - although from past experience I'm fairly sure that at some point I will fall into the trap of thinking I'm well enough to start leaping into action again - but luckily for me my wife's very good at reining in my stupidity. She's had a lot of practise!        
       
  • advertisement
  • Sounds like you have a pretty smart (and tolerant) wife!!  ;)
    Kimmy72, Spine-health Moderator
    Firm believer in PMA!
  • Nicholas_IINNicholas_II CroatiaPosts: 66
    edited 06/26/2016 - 8:31 PM
    This surgery is post. op. very painful and causes the shock. I can tell that even 6 weeks after I am in a state of shock, but not as it was 3 weeks after. It will pass with time. As we are all very different people in similar situations, we wish different things. I knew that my surgeon will sincerely reply to any of my question but I choose not to ask something that may bring me into more fear than I had. I had only two quetions: one for anestesiologist was what is the chance that I die during the surgery and second for neurosurgeon what are the chances I get paralyzed. I had an advance directive regarding coma and that was it. Came to the hospital, faced the fear and got in the terror of the ugly pain post. op., but I think it was worthy!

    Kimmy72 is completely right with the brain (theory) and body (reality) issue, because I have done many things to make it worse. But also, I have learnt much about my body, how is it working, know the difference between muscular or nerve pain (which is very important), so if you do mistakes try to take best from them so in future you'd know more how to deal it by yourself. 
    Kristijan (33)

    St. post vertebrosynthesis transpedicularis Th11-Th12-L1-L2 sec Expidium, Stabilization (10.5.2016.)
    Scoliosis THL Gravis (as of age od 13)
    Protrusio disci L3/L4
    Osteochondrosis
    Radiculopathia C6C7 bill, C8Th1 dec, L3L4 i L5S1 bill
    Hemangioma Th8
    Sy CC et CB
    Sy thoracale
    Sy LS chr

  • kevinmbrookskkevinmbrooks north yorkshirePosts: 6
    'State of shock' describes it perfectly, and even if it is a rare occurrence, I still think patients should be made aware that it could happen. After all, we are made aware of other rare but possible outcomes - infection, paralysis, nerve damage, etc. I'm sure if I'd known that there was a chance (no matter how small) of waking from the anaesthetic in extreme pain, it wouldn't have been quite so traumatic.      
  • advertisement


  • 'State of shock' describes it perfectly, and even if it is a rare occurrence, I still think patients should be made aware that it could happen. After all, we are made aware of other rare but possible outcomes - infection, paralysis, nerve damage, etc. I'm sure if I'd known that there was a chance (no matter how small) of waking from the anaesthetic in extreme pain, it wouldn't have been quite so traumatic.      

    I can see your point, Kevin.  It would probably spare patients needless anxiety/trauma if post-op pain levels were, like the rare complications you mentioned, discussed beforehand. 

    Kimmy72 is completely right with the brain (theory) and body (reality) issue, because I have done many things to make it worse. But also, I have learnt much about my body, how is it working, know the difference between muscular or nerve pain (which is very important), so if you do mistakes try to take best from them so in future you'd know more how to deal it by yourself. 

    Just coming from a place of "been there, done that",  Nicholas!!  You're right, it's definitely a learning experience, for sure!  I do find I've been saying "maybe I shouldn't have done that" less and less these days!! :) 
    Kimmy72, Spine-health Moderator
    Firm believer in PMA!
advertisement
Sign In or Register to comment.