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Going to see the NS today

downinmyheartddowninmyheart Posts: 497
edited 06/11/2012 - 8:23 AM in Back Surgery and Neck Surgery
I am going to see my NS today about the probability of setting up a PLIF or TLIF. Wish me luck!

One Love,

Stephanie
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Comments

  • You are so young to have so much pain! I do wish you the best at your appointment today. Hopefully they can come up with a solution so you can enjoy being young! Blessings to you today.
  • Good luck! I have an appointment on Thursday for the same thing with a neuro, so I know how you feel. ;))
  • Whatever the surgery may be. I read that a PLIF is an extension of the TLIF. They add on other procedures from what I understood and it's supposed to be better.
    I had a TLIF in June and am in week 15 of recovery. You're so young and I hope that works for you. Read all you can when you get a definate answer. People's experiences ( You can PM and ask me mine if you want) videos, and find out what you're going to need on hand at the hospital and home. Your insurance will pay a portion of the modalities if your surgeon writes a script for them (cane, raised toilet seat, walker). Get a grabber so you don't bend down to pick up anything. You'll have lots of limitations for a few weeks. Valuable info can be found here. Educate yourself and learn what you're getting into.
    We're here for you and hope you get to feeling better.
  • I had the TLIF done 6/28 and, like most, I have my good days and bad days. Here is info about the TLIF I found on this site. You can read the entire article by doing a search on TLIF Surgery. "Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) surgery By: Peter F. Ullrich, Jr., MD Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (called a TLIF) is essentially like an extended PLIF. It was developed in response to some of the technical problems with a PLIF procedure. The main difference between the two spine fusion procedures is that the TLIF approach to the disc space is expanded by removing one entire facet joint (whereas a PLIF is usually done on both sides by only taking a portion of each of the paired facet joints).

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion description:
    By removing the entire facet joint, visualization into the disc space is improved and more disc material can be removed. It should also provide for less nerve retraction. Because one entire facet is removed it is only done on one side. Removing the facet joints on both sides of the spine would result in too much instability. With increased visualization and room for dissection a larger implant and/or bone graft can be used. Theoretically, this can allow the spine surgeon to distract the disc space more and realign the spine better (re-establish the normal lumbar lordosis).

    Although this has some improvements over a PLIF procedure, the anterior approach in most cases still provides the best visualization, most surface area for healing, and the best reduction of any of the approaches to the disc space. This however must be weighed against the increased morbidity (e.g. unwanted aftereffects, postoperative discomfort) of a second incision."

    Hope this info is helpful.

  • I really appreciate you taking the time to give me your views and opinions and experiences. It is all useful info.

    One Love,

    Stephanie
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