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ESI for leg pain

AnonymousUserAAnonymousUser Posts: 49,671
I used to get ESI's every 3 or 4 mos. and got huge relief from my leg pain (anterior thigh on down through feet - both sides). Then had laminectomy and ended up much worse than pre-surgery.

I'd like to go back to ESI's, but just before last one over a year ago, had a test for osteoporosis and have it in the area of the ESI's (L4/L5). Does anyone know anything about whether the ESI can contribute to osteoporosis at the site of the injections? I'd have them forever (and probably would need to - I'm almost 60 but my mom is almost 99 - I may live another 40 years!) - but worry about long term effects of the ESIs.....

I appreciate any info! Thanks to all! Rosa


  • Repeated use of a steroid is very hard on bones. Steroids contribute to the break down of bone and keep it from building up. There is a form of osteoporosis that is called "steroid induced osteoporosis." Steroids can cause bone to be removed or lost faster than it can be replaced.

    This is one reason why careful doctors limit the number of injections a patient can have in a year.
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