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Info/Experience with Neurosurgeons???

donutmomddonutmom Posts: 9
edited 06/11/2012 - 7:53 AM in Upper Back Pain, Thoracic
I have an appointment with a Neurosurgeon next month. This is basically going to be my second oppinion from what my last doctor said. He told me that I would have to deal with my pain for the rest of my life and nothing can be done. I am just wondering what other peoples experiences have been with this kind of doctor.

Thanks so much for any help you can give.
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Comments

  • and the orthopedic consultants they are more BMW!.sorry unable to resist ..neurosurgeons tend to do nerves orthopedic tend to do bone ..that's the simplified version .there is a cross over between them both .but i am not far off regarding personality the orthopedic consultants that i have met tend to be a but gunge ho and the neurosurgeons tend to be a bit more reserved .that just my observation
    tony
    1997 laminectomy
    2007 repeat laminectomy and discectomy L4/L5
    2011 ALIF {L4/L5/S1}
    2012 ? bowel problems .still under investigation
    2014 bladder operation may 19th 2014
  • I like my ortho. He's fellowship-trained and is very good to me. I think it's Dave (Metalneck) that says we have ortho problems causing nerve problems, not nerve problems causing ortho problems. To me that pretty much sums it up.

    Just my 2 cents worth.
    Cathie
  • When it comes to the thoracic spine you must see a neurosurgeon and he/she should be experienced in this area.
    Thoracic spine surgery is complex and tricky and not many neurosurgeons are prepared to undertake this.
    It will only be sanctioned if there is a real and immediate risk of paralysis.

    mick
    I'm not young enough to know everything - Oscar Wilde
  • Sometimes you just have to find the right Neurosurgeon.
    My first neurosurgeon (in GA after I had the car accident that broke 3 thoracic vertebrae, one in a burst fracture) said to come back in see him when i started losing neuro function (like wetting my pants).
    After the pain got much worse and we moved to TN I found a new neuro who said surgery probably wasn't an option but he referred me to a guy more comfortable with thoracic injury. Finally I found a doc willing to say something more than 'wait and see' and he offered me TWO surgical options. I felt like someone had finally give me hope. If the doc tells you he doesn't recommend surgery or won't do surgery, ask for a recommendation for someone who might be willing. Not that i'm saying you SHOULD have surgery, just that you should be given ALL of your options.
  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 10,045
    Take a look at:
    Different Spinal Doctors

    One thing that always bothers me is when a doctor tells a patient that they are going to be in pain for the rest of their lives and there is nothing they can do.

    To me, thats the sign that you really need a second opinion. I am very curious as to WHY your doctor told you this. Do they have any rationale to back this up?

    Its one thing if the doctor told you that there was nothing that THEY could do. There are so many treatments available today, so they need to be looked into.
    Ron DiLauro Spine-Health System Administrator
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: rdilauro@veritashealth.com
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