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Yoga or no yoga?

I was wondering how many people who have had multiple herniated lumbar discs/surgeries do yoga. I have never tried yoga and I'm wondering if it is something I could do once I recover. Considering my history (see signature/profile) I wasn't sure if it would be a good idea.
25 years old: Herniated L4-L5, L5-S1 December 2008. L4-L5 microdiscectomy Sept 2010. L5-S1 microdiscectomy March 2012. Redo L4-L5 microdiscectomy Sept 2013. Redo microdiscectomy Oct 2015.
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Comments

  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 10,049
    that are geared up for people with spinal problems.

    General yoga can be harmful to people with disc problems. If you talk to a yoga instructor who doesnt understand all about the spine surgeries, discs, etc, they will tell you everything is ok.

    My physiatrist put me in touch with a specific type of yoga instructor. This man specialized in yoga exercise for spinal patients. I did give it a try, but at the time, I guess I just wasnt into it or ready for it.

    Check around, ask your doctor(s) how they feel about yoga for you.
    Ron DiLauro Spine-Health System Administrator
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: rdilauro@veritashealth.com
  • Have you thought about Tia Chia(Spelling)? It is a series of movements performed in a slow, focused manner.Experience the gentle flowing, movements of Tai Chi and treat your whole body to a gentle and relaxing workout. We have a senior center that offers it 1x per week here, I have went and watched it but didn't participate, but maybe after my surgery I will give it a try. If you haven't seen it you can Google it.
    Has anyone else tried this?
    Irene
    Irene
    Orlando Florida
    4 Level ACDF
    October 15th, 2013
  • There are some yoga postions that can provide a good stretch for certain back /neck conditions, Your Physical Therapist shoud be able to tell you which are safe for you. I have 5 I do in the am to stretch,
    Yoga has become competitive at some studios and could aggrevate spinal conditions
    Tai chi would be worth looking into also, a lot of churches offer classes near me.
  • I use to love yoga, but wasn't sure if I'd ever get to do it again... I now have no discs to worry about (in regards to yoga) and have started doing some at home via DVD and have been pleasantly surprised at just how much I can do. (of course I'm so far out of practice its pathetic)... I'm hoping to get back into a yoga class eventually.
    33yo mom of two. My surgical history...preadolescence scoliosis, kyphosis, and a hot mess.... 5 spine surgeries and lots of items added I wasn't born with (titanium, peek, surgical steel). Guess cremation is out. TSA loves me.
  • SpineyKD23SSpineyKD23 IllinoisPosts: 89
    edited 10/04/2013 - 11:33 AM
    Hmm sounds like I need to take my time and talk to my surgeon, previous physical therapist, etc. I'll look into Tai Chi too.
    25 years old: Herniated L4-L5, L5-S1 December 2008. L4-L5 microdiscectomy Sept 2010. L5-S1 microdiscectomy March 2012. Redo L4-L5 microdiscectomy Sept 2013. Redo microdiscectomy Oct 2015.
  • I would LOVE to try yoga now that I am 100% fused, just one level.... :) I'd love any feedback.
    Olivia Douglass
    MIS TLIF L5/S1 on 5/1/13
  • I say go for it!
    33yo mom of two. My surgical history...preadolescence scoliosis, kyphosis, and a hot mess.... 5 spine surgeries and lots of items added I wasn't born with (titanium, peek, surgical steel). Guess cremation is out. TSA loves me.
  • Hi, I love yoga but has a fall from my horse last year with a broken wrist as a result and that took a long, long time to regain mobility, still not at 100%. Now, the whole back drama so I'm really out if practice. I get that I need to modify poses but is there a style anyone has tried and liked? I live in a teeny town directly in the middle of nowhere, so no specialized yoga instructors to assist. So, living room Yoga is what I'm thinking. I'm really stiff and just started PT but its expensive so not planning on going longer than one month to that and would like to use yoga to increase flexibility and balance. Nerve damage has made me wobbly. Suggestions appreciated for favorite DVD or program.
    L5 S1 MicroD - August 21, 2013
    L5 S1 Fusion - October 17, 2013
    44 year old
  • bevnice343bevnice343 Posts: 2
    edited 12/12/2013 - 6:57 PM
    I have a long great relationship with yoga...not such a great relationship with my back though :( Although I have gotten back into yoga, I can't do all of what I used to. I have also noticed bad changes in my skin. I came across this post oddly. Anyway, I think yoga is fine as long as you talk to your doctor first and confirm with them!

    Link removed, solicitation not permitted.Please read the Forum rules
    Post Edited by Liz Spine-Health Moderator Team
  • I have some yoga poses given to me by my physical therapist, some others from massage therapist. A version of "cobra" where I come up and go back down ten times in quick succession, with no holding, three times a day. "Spine twist" which I hold for 20 seconds, five repetitions on each side, twice a day. "Warrior" hold 20 secs, 3 reps each leg. "Cat pose" and "cow pose", not sure how many I'm supposed to do of that.

    Ask your PT about which yoga poses might be safe and beneficial for you. Like someone else said, some are good, some are risky if you have a back problem.
  • Where I go for PT they are a spine specialty group and they offer yoga there. The class is designed for patients with back injuries. Your surgeon might know if there is something like that in your area.
  • Hello, I am currently graduating as a yoga teacher this Saturday. I can tell you honestly that yoga can be very good for people. But I think every person is so unique that it depends on your case. I had a herniated lumbar disc L4-L5 because I did the scorpion yoga pose. I am sure that was not only why I had it, but it definitely did not help with the inflammation. I have been able to recover without yoga. It is very important that you listen to your body and what you think it can do. I recommend you try soft types of yoga. Not vinyasa or hot yoga (because the heat of the sauna might stretch your muscles and ligaments our of normality while you are in the heat, but when you go out of the room the stretch back again). And before any physical activity you do, always ask your physician or doctor. Good luck!
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