Spinal stenosis occurs when the spinal cord in the neck (cervical spine) or the spinal nerve roots in the lower back (lumbar spine) are compressed. Symptoms of lumbar stenosis often include leg pain (sciatica) and leg tingling, weakness, or numbness. Arm pain is a typical symptom of cervical spinal stenosis. For cervical spinal stenosis with myelopathy, difficulty with coordination often occurs.

Stenosis treatment may include non-surgical options (exercise, anti-inflammatory medication, epidural injections, and activity modification) or back surgery.

Many people with lumbar spinal stenosis find that they can successfully manage their condition through an easy self care program including specific exercises, posture changes, pain management and nutrition.

Many people with lumbar spine stenosis successfully manage their condition through a self-care program including exercises, posture changes, pain management and nutrition.
Lumbar spinal stenosis may be diagnosed if degenerative changes have narrowed the bony openings of the spine and affected the nervous tissues.
The goal of spinal stenosis surgery is to decompress the neural structures and provide more room for the spinal cord, cauda equina, and/or nerve roots.

The classic symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis is leg pain that increases while walking, standing, or bending backward.

Lumbar spinal stenosis may be treated with nonsurgical and/or surgical methods. Unless a medical emergency, treatment of spinal stenosis pain is almost always initiated with nonsurgical techniques.
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