Most episodes of neck pain are due to muscle strain or soft tissue sprain (ligaments, tendons), but it can also be caused by a sudden force (whiplash). These types of neck pain often improve with time and non-surgical care such as medication and chiropractic manipulation. But if neck pain continues or worsens, there is often a specific condition that requires treatment, such as cervical degenerative disc diseasecervical herniated disc, cervical stenosis, or cervical arthritis.

Learn the conservative (non-surgical) and surgical approaches that are available to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

Cervical osteophytes are not painful, but if they impinge on the spinal cord or nearby nerve roots, vertebral discs, or blood vessels, symptoms such as radicular pain, neck stiffness, headaches, and dysphagia may arise.

If bone spurs become symptomatic, there are several non-surgical treatments that can alleviate symptoms including physical therapy, heat and ice therapy, pain medication, and chiropractic manipulation.

Cervical radiculopathy signs and symptoms typically include pins-and-needles tingling, numbness, and/or weakness. The location of these symptoms (e.g. fingers) will differ depending on which nerve root is affected.
The treatment for cervical radiculopathy will depend mainly on the severity and the underlying cause of the patient's symptoms.
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